Relazioni multiple di potere nei la gestione dei flussi migratori (ing.- fr.)

imm 1Multiple power relations in the movements of migrants management  –This paper will focus on one key agency within the international government of borders: the International Organization for Migration ( IOM). Representing itself as `the migration agency’, the IOM today operates as a major source of intelligence, assessment, advice, and technical assistance in connection with national and regional border policies and practices.

It does so in connection with a wider claim that it is helping to ensure `the orderly and humane management of migration’ on a worldwide basis (IOM, 2009). The IOM was founded in 1951, the same year as the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Initially called Provisional Intergovernmental Committee for the Movement of Migrants from Europe, it was the product of a Belgian and US initiative (Bojcun, 2005, page 6). However, unlike the UNHCR, the IOM was based on economic rather than humanitarian principles. As Morris explains, whereas the UNHCR derives its mandate from international l aw and agreements”, the IOM is a membership organization, not a UN agency. Nevertheless, it has grown quite significantly in recent years. It now boasts a total of 127 member states and a program budget for 2008 which exceeds US $1 billion. This sum funds nearly 7000 staff serving in more than 450 field offices i n m o re than 100 countries. It now operates in four main areas of what it calls `migration management’: migration and development, facilitating migration, regulating migration, and addressing forced migration. While significant in terms of its scale, the IOM’s expansion within the field of international borders, migrants, and refugee policy has not been without controversy, particularly as IOM describes key aspects of its activities using the language of humanitarian assistance. This has troubled some of the agencies with a longstanding association with humanitarianism; they point out that not only does the IOM lack the proper mandate to act in this area, but it has engaged in activities which actually violate the human rights of migrants. These range from its participation in the asylum determination process `imposed’ on Haitian asylum seekers to its facilitation of the deportation of Burmese migrant workers in Thailand. The IOM’s involvement in the management of state borders would appear to be unsettling the borders of the humanitarian complex. Despite the fact that the IOM has become a major operator in the field of international borders and migration governance, there is surprisingly very little academic research that has interrogated this agency. Migration scholars routinely use IOM material as data and often participate in IOM research and policy programs. But rarely has the IOM been the subject of critical scrutiny itself.

One argument of this paper is that it is high time that the IOM was made an object of inquiry in its own right. As a contribution to this task, this paper focuses on the IOM’s involvement in the international government of borders. We develop two arguments about the IOM and, indirectly, the international government of borders. The first of these concerns the most appropriate way to theorize this phenomenon and assess its political logic. Specifically, we argue that, although concepts like empire are undoubtedly useful in offering a larger narrative in which to place these questions, key insights can be gained by drawing on recent work on the theme of international neoliberalism and global governmentality. This line of analysis depicts global governance less as a project of creating an entirely new regime of power operating on a global level somewhere `above’ the world of states and much more as a complex of schemes which govern through the elicitation of state agency and the regulated enhancement and deployment of state capacity. This move has several theoretical benefits, not the least of which is to specify what is novel about contemporary regimes and programs of international order. Second, we argue that the field of activities and programs of agencies like the IOM should be taken much more seriously and regarded as a sphere meriting careful empirical study. While it may appear as a rather dull space of technical concepts and managerial practices, a more nuanced understanding of the international government of borders requires us to carefully interrogate these practices. These should be studied not primarily as a matter of offering a more fine-grained analysis of a bigger process. Rather, a close reading of practices like `border management’, `assisted voluntary return’, and `capacity building’ offers important insights about the ethos and rationality of international government. It brings into focus that this is a terrain comprising multiple power relations, tactics, and manoeuvres. It develops the point that this is not a system which works by coercion or discipline alone but, as numerous studies of contemporary governmentality have stressed, through the calculated construction of states and other collectivities as subjects who bear an ability and a responsibility to shape their futures by making informed and strategic choices.

Whereas specific border sites like the land crossing, the seaport, and the airport have been examined in some depth, and while, as we noted above, there has been much discussion of the globalization of border controls and a new global regime of mobility control, there has been relatively little investigation of those international agencies and programs whose business it is to promote standards and to regulate and communicate norms about border control. Correspondingly, the activity of the IOM, possibly the main actor in this respect, has gone largely unnoticed. However, there are exceptions to this rule. Perhaps the most notable is Duvell’s investigation of the IOM, which he frames in terms of the globalization of migration control (Duvell, 2003). Duvell astutely observes that recent years have seen a range of transnational migration agencies rise to prominence. Their advance has gone hand-in-hand with recognition on the part of policy makers and experts that new concepts, programs, scales, and frameworks for migration policy are necessary in the face of the challenge of globalization. Rebranding itself as a global organization, and operating within a division of regulatory labor alongside agencies devoted to the humanitarian (UNHCR) and the securitarian (International Center for Migration Policy Development), the IOM is a key element within this transnational regime. Duvell’s discussion of the IOM is helpful in a number of ways. First, he conveys a sense of the broad array of activities which now fall under IOM’s remit. These range from offering advice and technical assistance to national governments in implementing detention centers and the development of campaigns to combat the trafficking of women to quite specific activities like the compensation of non-Jewish victims of Nazism’s slave-labor programs. In this paper we are interested in one aspect of the IOM’s activities and programs: how they are making borders into a space of expert knowledge and international policy. As we will show in the following section, this is done under the rubric of advancing an `integrated’, or `comprehensive’, approach to migration control. Within this larger framework, border management is one component of a wider set of measures that have come to be associated with the idea of `migration management’.

Extracts and summary from an article of Rutvica Andrijasevic & William Walters.

imm 2

Cet article s’intéressera plus particulièrement à une agence clef dans le gouvernement international des frontières : l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM). Cette dernière, qui se présente comme l’« agence pour les migrations », opère comme une source majeure de renseignements, d’évaluation, de conseil et d’assistance technique en relation avec les politiques et les pratiques des États et des régions en termes de frontières. Elle fait cela tout en revendiquant plus largement sa capacité à garantir que « les migrations s’effectuent en bon ordre et dans le respect de la dignité humaine » sur le plan international. L’OIM a été fondée la même année que le Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (UNHCR), en 1951. Initialement baptisée Comité intergouvernemental pour les migrations européennes, elle était le produit d’une initiative américano-belge, mais à l’inverse du HCR, les motivations de l’OIM partaient de principes économiques plus qu’humanitaires. Comme l’explique Morris, tandis que le HCR « tient son mandat du droit et d’accords internationaux », l’OIM est une « organisation fondée sur l’adhésion, pas une agence des Nations Unies». Elle s’est toutefois élargie de manière significative ces dernières années et compte actuellement cent vingt-sept États membres et un budget excédant en 2008 le milliard de dollars. Cette somme finance près de 7 000 agents dans plus de quatre cent cinquante agences sur le terrain, et ceci dans plus de cent pays. Elle opère dans quatre domaines principaux qu’elle appelle la « gestion des migrations » : « migration et développement », « migration assistée », « migration régulée » et « migration forcée ». Aussi significative que soit cette expansion dans les champs des politiques liées aux frontières internationales, aux migrants et au droit d’asile, elle n’a pas été sans soulever des controverses, en particulier lorsque l’OIM décrit des éléments phares de ses activités en usant du vocabulaire de l’assistance humanitaire. Cela n’a pas été non plus sans troubler certaines agences œuvrant sur le terrain de l’humanitaire depuis de nombreuses années. Celles-ci pointent le fait que non seulement l’OIM n’a pas le mandat approprié pour agir dans ce domaine, mais aussi que l’agence a pris part à des activités contraires au respect des droits de l’Homme, allant de sa participation au processus de détermination « imposé » aux demandeurs d’asile haïtiens à son concours dans l’expulsion de travailleurs migrants birmans de Thaïlande. L’implication de l’OIM dans la gestion des frontières étatiques semblerait troubler les frontières du complexe humanitaire. En dépit du fait que l’OIM soit devenue un acteur essentiel dans le champ de la gouvernance internationale des frontières et des migrations, peu de travaux universitaires viennent remettre en question cette agence. Les chercheurs travaillant sur les migrations utilisent régulièrement l’OIM comme source de données et participent à des programmes de recherches et de recommandations politiques. Au final, l’OIM fait très peu l’objet d’observations critiques. Un des arguments de cet article est qu’il est grand temps de faire de l’OIM un objet de recherche en soi. En s’intéressant plus particulièrement à la participation de l’OIM dans le gouvernement international des frontières, cet article constitue un pas dans cette direction. Deux arguments relatifs à cette organisation, et incidemment au gouvernement international des frontières seront développés : le premier concerne la manière la plus appropriée de théoriser ce phénomène et d’évaluer sa logique politique. Plus précisément, nous considérons que si des concepts comme celui d’« empire » sont d’une utilité indiscutable pour offrir un discours plus large où placer ces questions, des travaux plus récents sur le thème du néolibéralisme international et de la gouvernementalité globale peuvent apporter de nouvelles perspectives intéressantes. Cette ligne d’analyse présente la gouvernance globale moins comme un projet de création d’un régime de pouvoir entièrement neuf opérant à un niveau global, quelque part « au-delà » du monde des États et bien plus comme un ensemble de procédés qui gouvernent, au travers d’incitations à l’intervention des États, à l’amélioration régulée et au déploiement des capacités de ces derniers. Cela présente plusieurs avantages théoriques, notamment celui de préciser ce qui est nouveau dans les régimes contemporains et les programmes d’ordre international. Deux arguments relatifs à cette organisation, et incidemment au gouvernement international des frontières seront développés : le premier concerne la manière la plus appropriée de théoriser ce phénomène et d’évaluer sa logique politique. Plus précisément, nous considérons que si des concepts comme celui d’« empire » sont d’une utilité indiscutable pour offrir un discours plus large où placer ces questions, des travaux plus récents sur le thème du néolibéralisme international et de la gouvernementalité globale peuvent apporter de nouvelles perspectives intéressantes. Cette ligne d’analyse présente la gouvernance globale moins comme un projet de création d’un régime de pouvoir entièrement neuf opérant à un niveau global, quelque part « au-delà » du monde des États et bien plus comme un ensemble de procédés qui gouvernent, au travers d’incitations à l’intervention des États, à l’amélioration régulée et au déploiement des capacités de ces derniers. Cela présente plusieurs avantages théoriques, notamment celui de préciser ce qui est nouveau dans les régimes contemporains et les programmes d’ordre international. Si des sites spécifiques tels que le poste de frontière terrestre, le port maritime, et l’aéroport ont été examinés de près, et si, comme nous venons de le noter, de nombreux travaux discutant la mondialisation des contrôles aux frontières et un nouveau régime global de contrôle des mobilités ont été réalisés, il existe relativement peu de travaux sur ces agences et ces programmes internationaux dont l’objectif est de promouvoir des standards et de réguler et communiquer les normes du contrôle aux frontières. Ainsi, l’activité de l’OIM, principal acteur dans le domaine, a été largement ignorée. Il existe toutefois quelques exceptions, dont la plus notable est sans doute la recherche menée par Düvell sur l’OIM, qu’il inscrit dans un processus plus général de mondialisation du contrôle des migrations. Düvell observe à juste titre que plusieurs agences transnationales sont devenues proéminentes ces dernières années et que cela s’est fait en même temps que les dirigeants politiques et les experts reconnaissaient que les « défis » de la mondialisation appelaient de nouveaux concepts, programmes, échelles et cadres pour les politiques migratoires. L’OIM, qui s’est qualifiée d’organisation « globale » et qui opère dans le cadre d’une division du travail de régulation aux côtés d’agences dévolues à l’humanitaire (par exemple le HCR) et au sécuritaire (par exemple le Centre international pour le développement des politiques migratoires), est un élément clef au sein de ce régime transnational. Les observations de Düvell sur l’OIM sont utiles à plus d’un égard. Premièrement, il rappelle le grand nombre d’activités qui tombe dorénavant sous l’autorité de l’organisation, allant du conseil et de l’assistance technique aux gouvernements nationaux dans la mise en place de centres de détention et de campagnes de «lutte» contre le trafic de femmes, à des activités spécifiques telles que la compensation des victimes non juives des programmes de travail forcé du nazisme. Nous nous intéresserons en particulier à la manière dont les activités et les programmes de l’OIM font des frontières un espace d’expertise et de politique internationale. Comme nous le montrerons plus tard, cela se fait dans le cadre de la promotion d’une approche « intégrée » ou « complète » du contrôle des migrations. Bien que centrale, la gestion des frontières devient, dans cette perspective, un élément parmi d’autres au sein d’un grand ensemble de mesures qui en sont venues à être associées à l’idée d’une « gestion des migrations ».

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s