L’embrione, il clone e la scimmia (Ing. & Fr)

rachael-replicant-sean-young

Rachael, replicant in Blade Runer

I limiti dell’essere umano sono infatti oggetto di dibattiti a volte accesi, di decisioni politiche o giudiziarie spesso contestate, di battaglie morale e scientifiche, di riflessioni filosofiche ed di esperienze artistiche. //// Embryo, clone and ape- “The case of cloning is even more problematic, it brings debates that go far beyond the religious spheres. To a large degree, the human clone is a phantasm, it is fascinating or frightening. It is the phantasm of the human being technically reproduced, as an object; more than with the embryo in vitro, the denaturing is in fact obvious with the clone. Here again the Christian origins of the opposition are clear. The Order of Nature is implemented by God, and within this natural order, sexual reproduction, the perpetuation of human species by the union between two adults of the opposite sex or even the forwarding of the original Sin by this union, are necessary since the eviction of Adam and Eve from paradise. But if man starts to violate the order of nature and create himself his fellow men, he will not play God’s role, but that one of the Devil.”

Regarding the issue of the human being in the Middle Ages, two questions both unsolvable arise concerning first the human being and then the Middle Ages. On the one hand we are immediately confronted with The question raised since Antiquity by philosophy: what is a human being? This question gave its name to all disciplines that define the modern time episteme, human sciences, not counting poets, playwrights, writers, artists who attempted to answer it their own way. On the other hand we meet the ‘Middle Ages’, a long period poorly defined during which the issue of the human being traditionally arises in a negative fashion. In any chapter of history of philosophy about Middle Ages, it is definitely felt that there is no issue with the human being. For traditional history of philosophy there is no philosophy worthy of the name in this age, there is only theology. In order to witness the Middle Ages retake its connotations and a particular topicality, we should cease to consider the human being as an a priori idea of which history would give a framework to observe the various ‘accidents’ – this form of history of ideas always amounts to relatively outline the ‘progress’ of an idea throughout centuries. We are not going to resume and complete the existing work on social forms making up the so called Medieval Human being: the knight, the priest, the merchant, etc. We shall look into those areas where the problem of the human being arise in terms of its limits. Instead of searching in existing data the answer to ‘what is a human being?’ we will put that question ‘where does the human being end?’ for an answer.

The bounds of the human being are sometimes subjects to fierce debates, to disputed political and court decisions, ethical and scientific struggles, philosophical questions and comments, arts experiences. It is entirely different to consider the issue of the human being in Antiquity from Plato’s definition in Alcibiades (man is nothing or, if he is something, it must be recognised that he cannot be anything but the soul) or from the matter of the slave: is he a man, a tool, an animal? We see here political, social, economic and ethical implications. In other examples, in the 17th century with Descartes, then in the 18th c. with Rousseau and Kant, a definition of the human being was given; from our point of view it is more interesting to be on the look out for a more historically problematic means of questioning the human being from the madness side. Yet it is true that in ethology, bioethics, neuroscience, social anthropology fields the bounds of the human being are most problematic.

Let us consider three emblematic examples: embryo, clone and ape. In those three cases, the human being bounds seem to have been reached; in any case it is subject to debate. The status of the embryo is the focus of constant debates s the VTP fairly generalised, to a lesser extent in vitro fertilisation and as the recourse to surrogate mothers. Those practices raise the problem of the human being from an unnatural reproduction, the human being (almost) artificially produced with important and complex ethical and moral issues: is the embryo a human being, is he a legal person on the same terms as the child is? Not strictly since, under conditions, its destruction is authorised by abortion (the death of the ’embryo’ is not mentioned). However, on the contrary, the embryo is not an object. According to French law, the conditions to study embryo are very constraining: the embryo must be ‘naturally’ produced, it must not be subject to a parental project, the parents must sign a written agreement and the studies must be approved by a commission. Confounding the viability of the age of premature infants and the legal time limit for an abortion led the law (bioethics Law of July 2004) to create the paradoxical category ‘human being not a person’. In this field the Law is more conservative than science or mores. The legal protection of the embryo actually has an utterly clear religious origin. Those opposed to abortion rights know it well. It is during the Christian Middle Ages that the embryo is discussed in terms on which the debate is based. In the struggles on Incarnation, Immaculate Conception, or the original Sin, theologians wondered from what point the soul united to the body: from the conception, during pregnancy, from birth, at baptism? This important question determines the time from which a living being becomes a human being. Aristotelians, as Saint Thomas Aquinas, think that the soul comes to the body only from the moment when it takes a human form (that leaves a period during which the embryo is not yet human) and the Stoics consider that the soul unties the body from the very beginning of the conception, the latter ends up by prevailing in the 19th century. That explains the current Catholic Church view on abortion in particular.

The case of cloning is even more problematic, it brings debates that go far beyond the religious spheres. To a large degree, the human clone is a phantasm, it is fascinating or frightening. It is the phantasm of the human being technically reproduced, as an object; more than with the embryo in vitro, the denaturing is in fact obvious with the clone. Here again the Christian origins of the opposition are clear. The Order of Nature is implemented by God, and within this natural order, sexual reproduction, the perpetuation of human species by the union between two adults of the opposite sex or even the forwarding of the original Sin by this union, are necessary since the eviction of Adam and Eve from paradise. But if man starts to violate the order of nature and create himself his fellow men, he will not play God’s role, but that one of the Devil. There is almost no science fiction film that shows human cloning other than as a great threat to humankind. Indeed, to be born is not enough to be human. There is the issue of the conception (natural or artificial) and the issue of the social construct.

Finally, the opposition or the relation between the human being and the animal is probably to set apart given its significant importance, even more in the Middle Ages than nowadays where the apes is the prime focus of reflection. Animality and divinity are the two great bounds of the human being limits in the Middle Ages. Those two bounds are apparent in the canonical definition of man since the human being is then considered as ‘a rational and mortal animal’ (Augustine): rational to be distinguished from animals, mortal to be distinguished from angels. As men animals are known for having a soul (superior animals even have some intellective abilities), and their body look altogether alike the human body regarding their physical constitution. By contrast, angels do not have a body, but men share with them the same spiritual nature as well as with God: man ‘belongs to the angelic substance’ through his soul. Thus the human being is defined by a double belonging to the animal kingdom and to the divine world. Gil Bartholeyns, Pierre-Olivier Dittmar, Thomas Golsenne, Vincent Jolivet et Misgav Har-Peled

art-byzantin

Dans la question de l’humain au Moyen Âge il y a en réalité deux questions tout aussi insolubles : la question de l’humain et la question du Moyen Âge. D’un côté on se confrontait à La question, celle que la philosophie n’a cessé d’interroger depuis l’Antiquité – Qu’est-ce que l’homme ? –, celle qui a donné son nom à tout l’ensemble de disciplines qui définit l’épistémè de l’époque moderne – les sciences humaines – sans compter les poètes, les dramaturges, les écrivains, les artistes qui y ont répondu à leur manière. D’un autre côté on voulait aborder une période historique longue et mal définie, le « Moyen Âge », au cours de laquelle le problème de l’humain se pose traditionnellement de manière négative. Prenez n’importe quelle histoire de la philosophie, regardez au chapitre « Moyen Âge », il apparaît nettement ceci : il n’y aurait pas de problème de l’humain au Moyen Âge. Du moins du point de vue philosophique. Car l’histoire traditionnelle de la philosophie nous apprend deux choses : d’abord, il n’y a pas de philosophie digne de ce nom au Moyen Âge, il n’y a que de la théologie.

Afin que le Moyen Âge reprenne des couleurs et une actualité insoupçonnées, il fallait cesser de considérer l’«  homme » comme une idée a priori dont l’histoire permettrait d’observer les différents « accidents », au sens d’Aristote – cette forme d’histoire des idées revenant toujours plus ou moins à tracer le progrès d’une idée au cours des siècles. Nous n’allons pas non plus reprendre et compléter le travail déjà fait sur les grands types sociaux qui composent ce qu’on a pu appeler L’Homme médiéval : le chevalier, le prêtre, le marchand, etc. Nous allons plutôt examiner les domaines dans lesquels le problème de l’humain se posait du point de vue de ses limites. Au lieu de demander aux sources : « Qu’est-ce que l’homme ? », nous leur demanderions : «  Où s’arrête l’humain ? »

Les limites de l’humain font en effet l’objet de débats parfois houleux, de décisions politiques ou de justice souvent contestées, de combats moraux et scientifiques, de réflexions philosophiques et d’expériences artistiques. Il est tout à fait différent d’envisager le problème de l’humain dans l’Antiquité en partant de la définition de Platon, dans l’Alcibiade (« L’homme n’est rien ou bien, s’il est quelque chose, il faut reconnaître que ce ne peut être rien d’autre que l’âme »), ou en partant de la question de l’esclave : est-il un homme, un outil, un animal ? Question dont on voit rapidement les implications politiques, sociales, économiques et morales. À l’époque classique, pour prendre un autre exemple, on peut certainement chercher chez Descartes, puis, au xviiie siècle, chez Rousseau, chez Kant, une définition de l’homme; de notre point de vue il paraît plus intéressant de rechercher du côté de la folie une façon beaucoup plus historiquement problématique d’interroger l’humain. Mais il est certain que c’est plutôt dans les domaines de l’éthologie, de la bioéthique, des neurosciences, de l’anthropologie sociale que les limites de l’humain posent le plus de problèmes aux sociétés d’aujourd’hui.

Prenons trois exemples emblématiques : l’embryon, le clone et le singe. Dans ces trois cas la limite de l’humain semble atteinte; en tout cas, elle fait débat. Le statut de l’embryon est l’objet de débats incessants depuis que l’interruption volontaire de grossesse s’est largement répandue, et dans une moindre mesure les fécondations in vitro ainsi que le recours aux mères porteuses. Ces pratiques posent le problème de l’homme non issu de la reproduction naturelle, de l’homme produit (presque) artificiellement, et soulèvent des questions morales et juridiques capitales : l’embryon est-il déjà considéré comme un être humain, est-il déjà une « personne juridique » ou « morale », au même titre que l’enfant ? Pas tout à fait, puisque sous certaines conditions, sa destruction est autorisée par l’avortement (on ne parle pas de la « mort » de l’embryon). Cependant l’embryon n’est pas non plus complètement un objet, bien au contraire. Dans la loi française, les conditions permettant aux scientifiques d’étudier des embryons sont très contraignantes : il faut que l’embryon soit produit « naturellement », qu’il ne fasse pas l’objet d’un « projet parental », que les parents signent leur accord par écrit et que les études soient approuvées par une commission. Les sciences, les mœurs et les lois ne s’accordent pas toujours dans ce domaine. La confusion de l’âge de viabilité des prématurés et de la période légale de l’avortement avait amené le droit (lois de bioéthique de juillet 2004) à créer la catégorie paradoxale d’« être humain non personne ». La loi, dans ce domaine, est plus conservatrice que la science ou les mœurs. La protection légale de l’embryon a en fait une origine religieuse tout à fait nette. Les opposants au droit à l’avortement le savent bien. C’est pendant le Moyen Âge chrétien que le statut de l’embryon est discuté dans les termes qui fondent le débat actuel. Dans les « disputes » sur l’Incarnation, sur l’Immaculée Conception ou sur le péché originel, les théologiens se sont demandé à partir de quand l’âme s’unissait au corps : dès la conception, pendant la grossesse, à partir de la naissance, au moment du baptême ? Question d’importance, qui déterminait le moment à partir duquel l’être vivant devient un être humain. Des « aristotéliciens », comme Thomas d’Aquin, qui pensent que l’âme vient au corps seulement à partir du moment où celui-ci commence à prendre forme humaine (ce qui laisse un laps de temps pendant lequel l’embryon n’est pas encore humain), et des « stoïciens », qui estiment que l’âme s’unit au corps dès la conception, ce sont les derniers qui finiront par s’imposer, au xixe siècle. Ce qui explique la position actuelle de l’Église catholique sur l’avortement notamment.

Le cas du clonage est encore plus problématique, il suscite aussi des débats qui dépassent largement les sphères religieuses. Le clone humain est en grande partie un fantasme, il fascine ou fait peur. C’est le fantasme de l’homme reproduit techniquement comme un objet; plus encore qu’avec l’embryon in vitro, la «  dénaturation » est évidente dans le clone.  Là encore, les origines chrétiennes de cette opposition sont évidentes. L’ordre de la nature a été instauré par Dieu, et dans cet ordre naturel, la reproduction sexuée, la perpétuation de l’espèce par l’union de deux adultes de sexe opposé, voire la transmission du péché originel par cette union, sont nécessaires depuis l’expulsion d’Adam et Ève du paradis. Mais si l’homme commence à enfreindre l’ordre de la nature et à vouloir créer lui- même ses semblables, ce n’est pas la place de Dieu qu’il prendra, c’est celle du diable. Presque aucun film de science-fiction aujourd’hui n’aborde le clonage humain autrement que comme une menace contre l’humanité elle-même. En effet, naître ne suffit pas pour être humain. Il y a la question de la conception (naturelle ou artificielle), et la question de la fabrication sociale. Enfin, l’opposition ou la relation entre l’homme et l’animal est sans doute à mettre à part, tant son importance est flagrante, plus encore au Moyen Âge qu’aujourd’hui, où c’est le singe qui est le foyer principal de la réflexion. L’animalité est, avec la divinité, l’une des grandes bornes qui posent les frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge. Ces deux limites se retrouvent dans la définition canonique de l’homme puisque l’homme est alors considéré comme « un animal rationnel et mortel » (Augustin) : rationnel pour se distinguer des animaux, mortel pour se distinguer des anges. Comme les hommes, les animaux sont réputés avoir une âme (les animaux supérieurs possèdent même certaines facultés intellectives), et leur corps est en tout point semblable au corps humain quant à leur constitution physique. À l’inverse, les anges n’ont pas de corps, mais les hommes partagent avec eux, de même qu’avec Dieu, une nature spirituelle : l’homme « participe de la substance angélique » par son âme. L’homme se définit donc par sa double appartenance au règne animal et au monde divin. Gil Bartholeyns, Pierre-Olivier Dittmar, Thomas Golsenne, Vincent Jolivet et Misgav Har-Peled

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s