La porosità dei confini tra il darwinismo sociale, il razzismo e l’eugenetica. (Fr. & Ing.)

banksy-the-geaners-millet-revisited

The porosity of the boundaries between social Darwinism, racism and eugenics-”Measured in terms of Plato’s Republic, or of Lykurgos’ legislations, eugenics based practices are immemorial, but eugenics as an organised and theorized science is a much more recent invention. It was founded in 1865 by Ch. Darwin’s cousin, by assimilating Darwinian theories and their extensions to human species.(…) Mental representations of contemporaries, their relationship to the ‘other’, to nature, to the history of their origins, are profoundly altered. (…) free choice nor a deistic vision, no further determine the vision of humanity, replaced by the biological determinism working in a guarded world of its own.”

Necessary redefinitions and historical brief outlines using a common denominator will demonstrate the ‘biologising’ speeches and most of all the porosity of the boundaries between social Darwinism, racism and eugenics. Measured in terms of Plato’s Republic, or of Lykurgos’ legislations, eugenics based practices are immemorial, but eugenics as an organised and theorized science is a much more recent invention. It was founded in 1865 by Ch. Darwin’s cousin, by assimilating Darwinian theories and their extensions to human species. Georges Vacher de Lapouge and his ‘anthropo-sociology’ is the emblematic figure of this ‘skinny and discordant squad’ of the French eugenics.

A hasty typology of diverse eugenics by their political options, their diverse understandings of biological sciences (Lamarckian, Darwinism, Mendelism), their dominant theory (social Darwinian, racial) or by the degree of their eugenics recommendations (positive eugenics: to promote individuals carriers of favourable genes, negative eugenics: to eliminate from reproduction those individuals with unfavourable genes) singularly reflects a blurry vision far too monolithic. Again, history of eugenics, from imaginary to eugenics practices is not our concern. By contrast, to the extent that genetics will fertilise evolutionist thinking -we might give thought to the synthetic theory of evolution- an analysis of the links between eugenics and social Darwinism or two social naturalist ways of thinking. Our questioning will be limited to the providing of eugenics by Darwinian and social Darwinian theories and the related development of sociobiology and political ideologies, and in return to the impact on the scientific community of debates involving normal activities of biological sciences. Our issue thus incorporates the history of cross-curricular transfer, the crossings from science to social Darwinian, eugenics based and racist doctrines, in other words ideologised biological sciences.

These political, social and ideological implications are nevertheless very clear and recalled by all their authors having studied eugenics based movements. Pro-eugenics are often scientistic academics believing in science and human rationality, and as such convinced (obsessed by the future of the race, the population or the Nation) that humans can control their environment and shape their own destiny. So that those pro-eugenics expressing de facto a political reformism belonging to the middle class or a socialist reformism or a powerful nationalist ideology, reduced the social problems to biological problems. In other words, eugenics theories fluctuate between reformist ‘bio-politics’, an innovative elitism and deliberately racist and totalitarian politics. These researches would have developed on a generalised concern, on a diffuse naturalism pre-existing the development of eugenics, as witnessed by social Darwinian movements at the end of the 19th century.

The notions of racism, in the true sense of the polysemous word, partly reflects contemporary public debates. In august 1978, The world conference to racism and social discrimination of the UNESCO also gives an expanded definition for racism as a reaction of hostility:

« Racism includes racists ideologies, prejudices attitudes, discriminatory behaviour, structural arrangement, and institutionalized practices resulting in racial inequality as well as the fallacious notion that discriminatory relations between groups are morally and scientifically justifiable. »

The extent of the word since 1967 is quite important, during a similar conference a narrower definition was given:

« Antisocial beliefs and acts which are based on the fallacy that discriminatory inter-groups relations are justifiable on biological grounds… Racism falsely claims that there is a scientific basis for arranging group hierarchically in terms of psychological and cultural characteristics that are immutable and innate. In this way, it seeks to make existing differences appear inviolable as a means of permanently maintaining current relations between groups. »

Obviously in just a few years, from the usual and misleading essentialist indicators the word ‘racism’ has been enriched or substituted by cultural, social and religious notions. This culturalist acceptance of the concept of racism, addressed to give account of the plurality of racist phenomena and the multiplicity of arguments, has not been easily carried out and debates were, to say the least, vigorous.

In this regard, a significant amount of work has, since these first UNESCO General Conferences, broadly renewed analysis and problems in order to return to a characterisation of racist speeches and phenomena while not underestimating explicitly or implicitly the main essentialist core.

Historians and sociologists of racism both agree that a considerable ideological leap occurred at the 19th century as the effort since the 18th century to rank races was enriched by evolutionist and mutation thematics. An important qualitative leap as those sciences provide a system of meaning, biological grounds to real or presumed human differences. Mental representations of contemporaries, their relationship to the ‘other’, to nature, to the history of their origins, are profoundly altered. The idea of “internal differences of nature” among human beings is introduced in anthropology and social sciences. Confrontations between monogenism and polygenism, taxonomy issues adapted to ‘human races’ classification, debates related to the evolution of these ‘races’, dominate the end of the 19th century and are undoubtedly consequential of the colonizer process by Western Nations. The concept of race may have been banal at that time, however racial prejudice with biological connotation belatedly arises at the end of the century. As such a new element, free choice nor a deistic vision, no further determine the vision of humanity, replaced by the biological determinism working in a guarded world of its own. Jean-Marc Bernardini CNRS, translated by myself.

modern-science

Eugénisme, racisme et Darwinisme social – Quelques redéfinitions et de brèves esquisses historiques sont nécessaires, d’une part, pour démontrer à l’aide d’un dénominateur commun, soit « la biologisation » des discours, la porosité des frontières entre le darwinisme social, le racisme et l’eugénisme. Si l’on s’en réfère à La République de Platon ou aux législations de Lycurgue, les pratiques eugénistes sont immémoriales, mais l’eugénisme comme science constituée et théorisée est d’invention beaucoup plus récente. Elle fut fondée par un cousin de Ch. Darwin, en 1865 par l’assimilation des théories darwiniennes et leur extension à l’espèce humaine. À la fin du xixe siècle et au début du xxe, cette eugénique de F. Galton trouve quelques disciples en France. Georges Vacher de Lapouge et son « anthropo-sociologie » constitue une figure emblématique de cette « escouade maigrichonne et discordante » des eugénistes français.

Une typologie hâtive des divers eugénismes par leurs options politiques, leurs diverses compréhensions des sciences biologiques (lamarckisme, darwinisme, mendélisme), leur dominante (darwinienne sociale, raciale) ou par le degré de leur préconisation eugéniste (eugénisme positif : favoriser les individus porteurs de gènes favorables, et négatif : écarter de la reproduction ceux qui ont des gènes défavorables) brouille singulièrement une vision par trop monolithique. Répétons-le, ce n’est pas l’histoire de l’eugénisme, de l’imaginaire eugénique aux pratiques eugéniques, qui nous préoccupe. En revanche, dans la mesure où la génétique va féconder la réflexion évolutionniste -songeons à la théorie synthétique de l’évolution —, il est légitime d’analyser les liens entre l’eugénisme et le darwinisme social soit deux modes de réflexions socio-naturalistes. Notre investigation se limitera à l’étude de l’irrigation de l’eugénisme par les théories darwiniennes et darwiniennes sociales, de l’élaboration en parallèle de sociobiologies ou d’idéologies politiques et en retour des incidences sur la communauté scientifique de ces débats périphériques à l’activité « normale » des sciences biologiques. Notre problématique intègre donc l’histoire des transferts transdisciplinaires, de ces passages de la science vers les doctrines darwiniennes sociales, eugénistes et racistes, soit des sciences biologiques idéologisées. !!!! Ces implications politiques, sociales et idéologiques sont d’ailleurs manifestes et rappelées par tous les auteurs ayant étudié les mouvements eugénistes. Les eugénistes sont souvent des scientistes, croyant en la science et en la rationalité humaine, et comme tels persuadés (obnubilés comme ils le sont par le devenir de la race, de la population ou de la nation) que l’homme peut contrôler son environnement et agir sur son destin. De sorte que ces eugénistes, exprimant de facto soit un réformisme politique propre aux classes moyennes, soit un réformisme socialiste ou encore une puissante idéologie nationaliste, réduisaient les problèmes sociaux à des problèmes biologiques. En d’autres termes, l’eugénisme fluctuerait entre une bio-politique réformiste, un élitisme réformateur et une politique totalitaire délibérément raciste. Ces activités se seraient ainsi développées sur l’humus d’une inquiétude généralisée, d’un naturalisme diffus préexistant à l’essor des eugénismes, en témoigneraient les vagues darwiniennes sociales de la fin du xixe siècle.

La notion de racisme, au vrai sens du terme polysémique, reflète pour partie les débats de société contemporains.

La conférence générale de l’UNESCO, d’août 1978, The world conference to racism and social discrimination, accorde également une définition élargie à cette réaction d’hostilité qu’est le racisme :

« Racism includes racists ideologies, prejudices attitudes, discriminatory behaviour, structural arrangement, and institutionalized practices resulting in racial inequality as well as the fallacious notion that discriminatory relations between groups are morally and scientifically justifiable. » (Racism, science (…) : 1983, p. 13)

On mesure l’évolution de ce mot depuis 1967, où dans une identique conférence générale était délivrée une définition plus restreinte :

« Antisocial beliefs and acts which are based on the fallacy that discriminatory inter-groups relations are justifiable on biologicals grounds… Racism falsely claims that there is a scientific basis for arranging group hierarchically in terms of psychological and cultural caracteristics that are immutable and innate. In this way, it seeks to make existing differences appear inviolable as a means of permanently maintening current relations between groups. » (Racism, science (…) : 1983, p. 12)

Manifestement en quelques années, le terme « racisme » s’est enrichi et aux habituels et fallacieux indicateurs essentialistes ou biologisants se sont ajoutées voire quelquefois substituées des notions culturalistes, sociales et religieuses. Cette acception culturaliste de la notion de racisme, élaborée pour rendre compte de la pluralité des phénomènes racistes ou racialistes et de la multiplicité des argumentaires, ne s’est pas effectuée sans douleur et les débats ont été pour le moins vigoureux. De ce point de vue un grand nombre de travaux ont, depuis ces conférences générales de l’UNESCO, largement renouvelé les analyses et les problématiques de l’époque, de sorte qu’aujourd’hui on semble revenir à une caractérisation des discours et phénomènes racistes ne mésestimant pas leur noyau dur explicitement ou implicitement essentialiste et biologisant (Lévi-Strauss : 1971, pp 647-666).

Les historiens ou sociologues du racisme s’accordent à reconnaître un saut idéologique notable au xixe siècle puisque l’effort entrepris depuis la fin du xviiie siècle pour classer les races humaines s’enrichit des thématiques transformistes et évolutionnistes. Saut qualitatif d’importance puisque ces sciences apportent un système de signification, une cause biologique aux différences humaines réelles ou présumées. Les représentations mentales des contemporains, de leur rapport à l’autre, à la nature, de l’histoire de leur origine, sont profondément modifiées. L’idée de « différences internes de nature » parmi les hommes est introduite en anthropologie, dans les jeunes sciences sociales. Les confrontations entre monogénistes et polygénistes, les problèmes de taxinomie adaptée à la classification des « races humaines », les débats concernant l’évolution de ces races dominent la fin du xixe siècle et sont incontestablement corrélatifs du processus colonisateur des nations occidentales. Si l’idée de race est banale pour la période, le préjugé racial à connotation biologique naît tardivement à la fin du siècle. Élément nouveau, car ce n’est plus le libre arbitre et une vision déiste qui déterminent la vision de l’humanité mais le déterminisme biologique officiant dans un monde clos. Jean-Marc Bernardini CNRS.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s