Giustizia Transizionale, miti e realtà. (Ing. & Fr.)

tj

Transitional Justice, myths and realities. “Frameworks of legitimate trauma are previously established, some will consequently be put forward, some deligitimized, others with irrelevant elements, in view of the singular process and context in which they are placed, will be partly excluded. There is like an official pre-definition of suffering, of legitimate trauma prior to the openness of expression. Therefore, TJ is consistent with and relies on a moral ethos that reduces the individual rights, and consequently, officially accepted sufferings and traumas are those that refer to this ethos. Testifying in front of an investigative body does not constitute a therapy. Such testimonies involve a risk of re-traumatisation. There is therefore an obvious risk of a transition of the liberating expression to the justification, the confrontation. In so doing, the therapeutic aspect is de facto being impaired. […]” Nour Benghellab, CNRS, translated by myself.

Transitional justice, myths and realities. Transitional Justice (TJ) is a process that purports to bridge traditional punitive justice and politics. Its purpose is to “heal” the “wounds” of the social fabric by promoting reconciliation and forgiveness. Its definition remains vague because it does not want to be a rigid concept but a toolbox that can be used in different contexts of transition. However, this article intends to question the foundations of this type of justice and to compare its therapeutic, legal and political missions with its observed effects. First, we will present the dominant discourse about the TJ in the literature; namely the TJ as a therapeutic and pacifying process of transitional societies. Second, noting the failure of the displayed mission, we will reread the role of the TJ in light of the theories of nationalism to make visible its other potential functions that would justify the continuation of its promotion despite the finding of its failures.

In  the report of the UN Secretary General of 23 August 2004 (“The rule of law and transitional justice in conflict and postconflict societies”), transitional justice was defined in the following manner:

The notion of transitional justice discussed in the present report comprises the full range of processes and mechanisms associated with a society attempts to come to terms with a legacy of large-scale past abuses, in order to ensure accountability, serve justice and achieve reconciliation. These may include both judicial and non-judicial mechanisms, with differing levels of international involvement (or none at all) and individual prosecutions, reparations, truth-seeking, institutional reform, vetting and dismissals, or a combination thereof.”

The official definition of transitional justice is thus an operationalising process of legal, political, psychological and moral solutions aiming to reconcile principles of justice, of forgiveness and truth for the purposes of national re-construction, thus of construction, constitution of new Sates. In short, TJ is defined both as a legal redress process and a therapeutic process on national level. Eirin Mobekk further defines to mean that : “on a broad general level the primary objectives of transitional justice are in essence twofold: first, to begin processes of reconciliation among the parties to the conflict and the affected populations by establishing a process of accountability and acknowledgment; and second to deter recurrence of violence, ensuring sustainable peace. Both judicial and non-judicial accountability can encourage reconciliation of post-conflict societies.”

TJ based on remembrance efforts does not fail to resurrect painful memories of tensions from the past and by doing so reopens several Pandora’s boxes (Dube, 2011 ; Thoms et al., 2010 ; Daly, 2008 ; Lundy, McGovern, 2008 ; Bucaille, 2007 ; Teitel, 2003 ; Hamber et al., 2000). Taking into account such a risk, TJ is linked to a toolkit of mechanisms whose purpose is to head off and defuse those tensions so that they stop encroaching the entire public sphere. Thus transitional justice would include therapeutic and cathartic mechanisms meant to be at the core of re-construction and pacification process of post-conflicts societies, the whole idea behind this being that healing, reconciliation and forgiveness are deeply interdependent. Healing and reconciliation help breaking cycles of violence and provide traumatised people with psychological well-being (Staub, 2003, 432. Voy. also Mendeloff, 2004, 359 ; Hamber et al., 2000). With this in mind, Kora Andrieu claims that transitional justice is based on the fact that only a calmer recollection of things of the past will allow reconciliation in the long run for a society bruised by war and dictatorship. In that, it applies to nations the terms of individual psychology (2014, 2). In particular, it is the truth commissions mandate and all other forms (experts reports and else) of therapeutic mechanisms that rely on the story, the speaking, the verbalisation as access to healing (Dube, 2011 ; Thoms et al., 2010 ; Mendeloff, 2004 ; Hamber et al., 2000). Those mechanisms would be platforms for abrecation or emotional release that allow an individual to externalise emotions linked to traumatic memories and consequently overcoming its psychological injuries. […] The produced effect is called catharsis (purification) (Lacas). Psychotherapeutic abrecation puts the discursive process at the centre of the healing process (Laplanche, Pontalis, 1967, 1). In addition, according to Aristotelian conception, catharsis is a regulation process of passions on individual and social level. That is the aspect of therapy by tragic staging on public scene on which transitional justice peace processes are based aiming at establishing monitored societies according to the Rule of Law. Because in fact, one considers that truth is a liberating experience and psychologically beneficial just as is the survivors arena for publicly telling their traumatic story (Hamber et al., 2000, 19). One then speculates that individual catharsis converts into collective catharsis and therefore would benefit and heal the society as a whole which would enable the subsequent cure of the social fabric. This ‘cure’ is then considered as a necessary stage for national reconstruction: one of the submissions dominating transitional justice, is that of truth and reconciliation, more precisely truth as being reconciliation. The reasoning here is that the public storytelling of truth leads to individual healing of victims and at the same time the general emerging truths lead to healing and reconcile the entire nation (Robins, 2012, 2). Yet to disclose the truth does not mean to cure. Therapeutic catharsis as envisioned by transitional justice experts disregards two aspects and that may undermine its effects: first, the indispensable advertising and the collectivisation – formalization and globalisation – highlight the features; then, the difficulty of involving these features in time told by a ritualised recurrence.

In transitional justice framework, the creation of a safe space and the assurance of the relationship of trust between the victim and the therapist seems to be difficult. This relation of trust cannot be ensured because very often, commissioned officers form part of – or are related to – the new elites of the new State in construction. The second feature limiting the boundaries of this safe space is the necessary advertising required by the TJ (Transitional Justice). Therapies are public and the expression of traumas, and legitimate trauma acceptance, are necessarily confined. Frameworks of legitimate trauma are previously established, some will consequently be put forward, some deligitimized, others with irrelevant elements, in view of the singular process and context in which they are placed, will be partly excluded. There is like an official pre-definition of suffering, of legitimate trauma prior to the openness of expression. Therefore, TJ is consistent with and relies on a moral ethos that reduces the individual rights (Thoms et al., 2010 ; Nagy, 2008 ; Humphrey, Valverde, 2008 ; Lundy, McGovern, 2008 ; Miller, 2008 ; McEvoy, 2007 ; Hamber et al., 2000), and consequently officially accepted sufferings and traumas are those that refer to this ethos. Thus various narrative frames, most of all between victims and executioners, collide, contradict each other. Supported patients by TJ are subjected to stress because having to face the possibility that their subjective expression will be contested, questioned, deligitimized or worse ignored. Testifying in front of an investigative body does not constitute a therapy. Such testimonies involve a risk of re-traumatisation. There is therefore an obvious risk of a transition of the liberating expression to the justification, the confrontation. The patient expressing himself, escaping any external pressure in a safe environment, is a situation that cannot be guaranteed by such process. In so doing, the therapeutic aspect is de facto being impaired. Nour Benghellab, CNRS, translated by myself.

_________________________________________

Dans son rapport sur le Rétablissement de l’état de droit et administration de la justice pendant la période de transition dans les sociétés en proie à un conflit ou sortant d’un conflit, le Secrétaire général des Nations Unies définit la justice transitionnelle (ci-après JT) de la façon suivante :

« (elle) englobe l’éventail complet des divers processus et mécanismes mis en œuvre par une société pour tenter de faire face à des exactions massives commises dans le passé, en vue d’établir les responsabilités, de rendre la justice et de permettre la réconciliation. Peuvent figurer au nombre de ces processus des mécanismes tant judiciaires que non judiciaires, avec (le cas échéant) une intervention plus ou moins importante de la communauté internationale, et des poursuites engagées contre des individus, des indemnisations, des enquêtes visant à établir la vérité, une réforme des institutions, des contrôles et des révocations, ou une combinaison de ces mesures » (SG-NU, 2004, 7).

La définition officielle de la JT est donc celle d’un processus d’opérationnalisation des solutions juridiques, politiques, psychologiques et morales visant à concilier les principes de justice, de pardon et de vérité aux fins de (re)construction nationale, donc de construction (constitution) d’États nouveaux. En bref, la JT est définie tant comme un processus de réparation juridique que comme un processus thérapeutique à l’échelle nationale. Eirin Mobekk précise en ce sens que :

« de façon générale, les principaux objectifs de la justice transitionnelle sont essentiellement de deux ordres : d’abord, amorcer un processus de réconciliation entre les parties au conflit et les populations touchées par la mise en place de mécanismes de reddition de comptes et de reconnaissance ; et ensuite, afin d’éviter un retour des violences, d’assurer une paix durable. En ce sens, la responsabilité judiciaire, comme non judiciaire, peut favoriser la réconciliation des sociétés post-conflit » (Mobekk, 2006, 2).

Comme la JT repose, entre autres choses, sur un travail de mémoire, elle ne manque pas de raviver certains souvenirs douloureux ou tensions du passé et d’ouvrir plusieurs boîtes de Pandore (Dube, 2011 ; Thoms et al., 2010 ; Daly, 2008 ; Lundy, McGovern, 2008 ; Bucaille, 2007 ; Teitel, 2003 ; Hamber et al., 2000). Face à ce risque, la JT est assortie d’une panoplie de mécanismes dont l’objectif est de circonscrire et de désamorcer ces tensions afin qu’elles ne débordent pas dans toutes les sphères de la vie publique. La JT inclurait ainsi des mécanismes thérapeutiques et cathartiques qu’elle mettrait au cœur du processus de (re)construction et de pacification des sociétés post-conflictuelles, l’idée sous-jacente étant que guérison, réconciliation et pardon sont profondément interdépendants. Guérison et réconciliation aident à briser les cycles des violences et la possibilité pour les personnes traumatisées d’atteindre un bien-être psychologique (Staub, 2003, 432. Voy. aussi Mendeloff, 2004, 359 ; Hamber et al., 2000). Kora Andrieu soutient dans cette optique que la justice transitionnelle part […] du fait que seule une mémoire apaisée permettra la réconciliation à long terme d’une société meurtrie par la guerre ou par la dictature. En ce sens, elle applique bien aux nations les termes de la psychologie individuelle (2014, 2). C’est la mission impartie, notamment, aux commissions-vérité (et réconciliation) et à toutes les autres formes (rapports d’experts et autres) de mécanismes thérapeutiques qui reposent sur le récit, la prise de parole, la verbalisation, en tant que voies d’accès à la guérison (Dube, 2011 ; Thoms et al., 2010 ; Mendeloff, 2004 ; Hamber et al., 2000).

Ces mécanismes deviendraient des lieux d’abréaction, soit de décharge émotionnelle qui permet[ent] à un sujet d’extérioriser un affect lié à un souvenir traumatique et, en conséquence, de se libérer de son poids pathogène. […] L’effet produit est appelé catharsis (purification, purgation) (Lacas). L’abréaction psychothérapique, ou abréaction secondaire, met le processus discursif au cœur du processus de guérison  (Laplanche, Pontalis, 1967, 1). De surcroît, suivant la conception aristotélicienne de la catharsis, celle-ci est un processus de régulation des passions autant sur le plan individuel que social (Porte, 2005, 3). C’est sur cet aspect, la thérapie par la mise en scène « tragique » et publique, que reposent les processus pacificateurs de la JT visant à instaurer des sociétés régulées par le droit, sur la base de la Rule of Law. L’on considère en effet que la vérité est libératrice et psychologiquement bénéfique tout comme l’est l’espace accordé aux survivants de raconter publiquement leurs histoires traumatiques (Hamber et al., 2000, 19). L’on suppute alors que les catharsis individuelles deviendraient catharsis collective et, ce faisant, bénéficieraient à la société dans son ensemble qui s’en trouverait « guérie » ce qui permettrait, la « cicatrisation » ultérieure du tissu social. Cette « cicatrisation » est ainsi considérée comme une étape nécessaire à la reconstruction nationale : un des narratifs dominants de la justice transitionnelle est celui de la vérité et de la réconciliation et, plus exactement, celui de la vérité en tant que réconciliation. Cela repose sur l’idée que le récit public de la vérité mène à la guérison individuelle des victimes et qu’à travers les vérités générales qui émergent, cela mène aussi à la guérison et la réconciliation de la nation dans son ensemble (Robins, 2012, 2). La catharsis thérapeutique de la JT omet deux aspects qui peuvent en saper les effets : d’abord, l’indispensable publicité et collectivisation – officialisation et universalisation – qui marquent ces dispositifs ; ensuite, la difficulté d’inscrire ces dispositifs dans un temps long scandé par une certaine récurrence ritualisée. 

Dans le cadre de la JT, il semble difficile de créer un espace sécurisé et d’assurer la relation de confiance entre le patient-victime et le thérapeute. La relation de confiance patient-thérapeute ne peut être véritablement assurée parce que, souvent, les commissionnés font partie – ou sont liés – des élites nouvelles des États en construction, point sur lequel nous nous pencherons plus en détail dans la seconde partie. Le deuxième aspect qui entrave la possibilité d’un tel espace est la nécessaire publicité que requiert la JT. Les « thérapies » de la JT sont publiques et l’expression des traumas, comme l’acceptation des traumas légitimes, y est nécessairement balisée. Les processus thérapeutiques s’en trouvent alors, au regard de l’orthodoxie, en quelque sorte, viciés. Car les cadres entourant les traumas légitimes sont préétablis, certains traumas seront donc mis de l’avant, d’autres délégitimés, et d’autres encore, amputés de leurs éléments réputés non pertinents au regard du processus et du contexte singulier dans lesquels ils s’inscrivent. Il y a comme une pré-définition officielle de la souffrance, du trauma légitime en préface à l’ouverture des espaces de paroles. De fait, la JT s’inscrit et repose sur un éthos moral qui la balise fortement, généralement celui des droits de la personne (Thoms et al., 2010 ; Nagy, 2008 ; Humphrey, Valverde, 2008 ; Lundy, McGovern, 2008 ; Miller, 2008 ; McEvoy, 2007 ; Hamber et al., 2000), en conséquence de quoi les souffrances et les traumas qu’elle accepte comme tels sont ceux qui renvoient à cet éthos. Ainsi, les diverses trames narratives, surtout entre victimes et bourreaux, s’entrechoquent, se contredisent, s’opposent. Les « patients » pris en charge par la JT subissent alors le stress de la possibilité de voir leur récit subjectif contesté, remis en question, délégitimé ou pire encore, ignoré. Témoigner devant un organe d’investigation n’équivaut pas à une thérapie. De tels témoignages comportent un risque de re-traumatisation. Il y a là un risque évident du passage de la prise de parole libératrice à la justification, à la confrontation. L’absence d’un espace sécurisé où la personne qui prend la parole échappe à toute possibilité de pression ne peut être garantie dans ce type de processus. Ce faisant, l’aspect thérapeutique s’en trouve de facto altéré.Nour Benghellab

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s