Memoria collettiva e democrazia liberale: le batteglie della giustizia transizionale (Ing. & Fr.)

turkestan

Photo credit: BreathTime, Turkestan, Mausoleum of Khoja Ahmed Yasawi

Collective memory and liberal democracy – The struggles of transitional justice. “In so far as every nation implies a collective history founded on a shared memory, transitional justice role, in the emergence and consolidation of this memory, becomes therefore a decisive challenge. However, this process cannot be built on an ideological vacuum neither can it follow a linear and consensual pathway. On the contrary, this process introduces itself as a struggle in which the supporters, in favour of a liberal democracy ideology, appear with superior resources to impose their views and interests at the expense of other sections of the population abandoned along the road to transition. (
) Consequently in developing countries, new elites emerge and consolidate precisely through adopting the best matching standards meeting the liberal model requirements.” Nour Benghellab CNRS, translated by myself.

Collective memory and liberal democracy – The struggles of transitional justice.

The specific focal point of the transitional justice mechanisms is featured by the concept of Nation, a key focus of our western imagination about large-scale political organisation. However, although the implementation of transitional justice mostly appears to be within the so-called non-Western States, the values upon which it is founded are in the first place those that the West is more likely to defend and promote (Miller, 2008 ; Nagy, 2008). Transition, as normally conceived within transitional justice theory, tends to involve a particular and limited conception of democratization and democracy based on liberal and essentially Western formulations of democracy. Individual rights protection, liberal democracy, free market, etc., appear like the essential conditions to chart the way forward for peace in order to achieve the political ideal reached by the Western pacified states. Proponents of transitional justice implicitly convey other underlying notions towards an idealised model (Humphrey, Valverde, 2008 ; Lundy, McGovern, 2008 ; Miller, 2008 ; Nagy, 2008 ; Bucaille, 2007 ; McEvoy, 2007). Thus, the idea of the need to a Nation, equally unique as united, building project is at the heart of transitional justice. This initiated national project will not be without effects on the nature of the process and its outcome. In so far as every nation implies a collective history founded on a shared memory, transitional justice role, in the emergence and consolidation of this memory, becomes therefore a decisive challenge. However, this process cannot be built on an ideological vacuum neither can it follow a linear and consensual pathway. On the contrary, this process introduces itself as a struggle in which the supporters, in favour of a liberal democracy ideology, appear with superior resources to impose their views and interests at the expense of other sections of the population abandoned along the road to transition.

According to Ruti G. Teitel, the modern concept of transitional justice emerges and constitutes in relation to nation building. Constructing or reconstructing a nation implies some specific mechanisms and processes. Benedict Anderson recalls that nations are imagined communities and henceforth non-natural in itself. This means mobilising certain tools to construct, then to consolidate the pillars on which the emerging Nation will be able to build, anchored in a national imagination, in other words the crystallisation of individual imaginations capable of being thought of as the part of the whole. Whether these pillars deal with ‘national identity’, ‘national history’, ‘national culture’ 
 (Anderson, 2006 ; Bourdieu, 2010a ; Bourdieu, 2012c ; Gellner, 1989 ; Nora, 1984), all are more or less calling for collective memories of the communities to nationalise, as tools of social anchoring and socio-political legitimisation. Transitional justice mechanisms are schemes of remembrance on two levels: as places of crystallisation of the collective identity and as arenas where the national memory is constructed, rationalised, recounted and institutionalised. Transitional justice becomes a real symbolic manufacturing laboratory of official components of the legitimate nation. Obviously this process of establishing an official memory-based heritage for the new nation, far from being a natural occurrence in the consensus, will have a painful birth through explicit or tacit struggles and confrontations (Nora, 1993, 1010 ; Bourdieu, 2010c ; Mendeloff, 2004, 370 ; Jelin, 2007). Maurice Halbawchs explained that any collective memory was constructed within a social group with permanent cross-checks of personal experiences and individual memories felt among its members. He also added that this memory was neither precise nor neutral to the extent that it combined various perspectives, that it only resulted from individual memories and collective narrative story in which memories take on forms and meaning (1952, 1968). Once included in the construction of the remembrance of another group, the individual memory remains the product of other narrative stories integrated in the collective memory in progress (Jelin, 2007). The social uses of historical memory are as diverse as the logics relating to identity.

Similarly, when observing the construction of collective memory processes of the transitional justice one has to cope with a tangle set of individual and collective memories. The rival groups raising their diverging voices express antagonistic memories: TJ’s mission is to reconcile them in order to result in a more coherent and rational narrative story (Gandsman, 2012 ; Daly, 2008 ; Jelin, 2007 ; Aronson, 2011) and to authenticate it as the official story of the universal aspiring Nation-State. However this rationalisation of the collective story through reconciliation of antagonisms fails because of continuous power struggles notably symbolic: power relations and the claim of hegemony are always present. It is a struggle for “my truth’’, with advocates, memory entrepreneurs and attempts to appropriate (and at times monopolize) meanings and interpretations [of this truth]. (Jelin, 2005, 198. Voy. aussi Bourdieu, 2010c ; Mendeloff, 2004, 370). A narrative story works towards to take the precedence over others, and the choice for the best story, more accessible, more ‘officialisable’ is often the result of a struggle with a winner meeting values and needs of the social organisation which all partners of the struggle will have to undergo (Nora, 1984 ; Bourdieu, 2010c). In times of transition the different ways narratives are told reflect, the conflict of mutually incompatible story canvasses (Gandsman, 2012 ; Dube, 2011 ; Daly, 2008, 26 ; Jelin, 2007), and the triumph and enforcement of some on the others. According to P. Bourdieu, to join the political game, legitimate, official, is to access the ‘universal’, the universal speaking, the universal points of view from which one can speak on behalf of all, of the universum, the entire group. One can speak on behalf of the public good, of what is good to every one and to use it for oneself (Bourdieu, 2012b, 16-17). In this sociological perspective we can see that transitional justice is a consistent/official process. This process meets international standards aimed at providing the right answer to a troubled past. In these processes, the benefit from the accumulated capital of the ‘internationalist universal’ implies the entry into the political game consistent with the dominant discourse: discourse on individual rights and liberal democracy. Indeed, all events unfold as if transitional justice mechanisms, imposed from above, from the international universal, meet international standards (Robin, 2012 ; Lundy, McGovern, 2008 ; Miller, 2008 ; Nagy, 2008 ; McEvoy, 2007). However, these standards are part of a global perspective defending the liberal democracy model: in the vast majority of cases, transition occurs in conjunction with a project of economic and/or political liberalization (Miller, 2008, 270). Structural adjustments foreseen for the ‘Washington process’, to take one example, are crucial and decisive fro transitional justice. Moreover it is now widely recognized that democratic states in transition are required the existence of a market economy that will allow the emerging States to find a legitimate place within the international economic organisation (Miller, 2008, 272 ; Lundy, McGovern, 2008, 276).

Consequently in developing countries, new elites emerge and consolidate precisely through adopting the best matching standards meeting the liberal model requirements. With the neo-liberal prevailing ideology, these groups easily find a collective narrative likely to meet the expectations of the official international model enabling them to conquer the necessary political capital.  

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Au cƓur des mĂ©canismes de la JT, figure gĂ©nĂ©ralement le concept de « Nation ». qui occupe une place centrale dans notre imaginaire, occidental, du moins, quant Ă  l’organisation politique Ă  grande Ă©chelle (Nora, 1993). Or, bien que la JT soit mise en Ɠuvre au sein d’États dits non occidentaux, les valeurs sur lesquelles elle repose sont d’abord celles que l’Occident est fortement enclin Ă  dĂ©fendre et Ă  promouvoir (Miller, 2008 ; Nagy, 2008). La transition, comme normalement conçue par la thĂ©orie de la justice transitionnelle, tend Ă  impliquer une conception particuliĂšre et limitĂ©e de la dĂ©mocratisation et de la dĂ©mocratie, une conception reposant sur des bases libĂ©rales, et essentiellement occidentales, de la dĂ©mocratie (Lundy, McGovern, 2008, 273). Les droits de la personne et leur dĂ©fense, la dĂ©mocratie libĂ©rale, le libre marchĂ©, etc., se prĂ©sentent comme des conditions devant nĂ©cessairement baliser le chemin vers la paix afin de parvenir Ă  cet idĂ©al politique qu’auraient atteint les sociĂ©tĂ©s pacifiĂ©es des États occidentaux (Mendeloff, 2004, 363). Les laudateurs de la JT charrient implicitement avec elle d’autres notions qui sous-tendent un modĂšle idĂ©alisĂ© vers lequel elle tendrait (Humphrey, Valverde, 2008 ; Lundy, McGovern, 2008 ; Miller, 2008 ; Nagy, 2008 ; Bucaille, 2007 ; McEvoy, 2007). Ainsi, l’idĂ©e de la nĂ©cessitĂ© de construire une Nation, autant unique qu’unie, se retrouve au cƓur du projet de la JT. Cette inscription d’un projet national implicite au cƓur de la JT n’est pas sans impact sur la nature du processus et de son issue. Dans la mesure oĂč toute nation suppose une histoire collective, elle-mĂȘme fondĂ©e sur une mĂ©moire partagĂ©e, le rĂŽle de la JT dans l’émergence, puis la consolidation, de cette mĂ©moire va s’avĂ©rer un enjeu particuliĂšrement dĂ©cisif. Or, le processus ne s’édifie pas dans une sorte de vacuum idĂ©ologique, pas plus qu’il ne se dĂ©roule selon un scĂ©nario linĂ©aire et consensuel. Au contraire, il se donne Ă  voir comme une lutte au sein de laquelle les partisans de l’idĂ©ologie de la dĂ©mocratie libĂ©rale, apparaissent comme dotĂ©s de ressources supĂ©rieures pour imposer leur vues et intĂ©rĂȘts au dĂ©triment d’autres parties de la population progressivement abandonnĂ©es sur le bord du chemin de la transition.

Selon Ruti G. Teitel, la notion moderne de la JT Ă©merge et se constitue en lien avec le nation-building (2003, 71). Construire ou reconstruire une nation implique certains mĂ©canismes, certains processus. Benedict Anderson rappelle que les nations sont des communautĂ©s imaginĂ©es (2006), et dĂšs lors non naturelles en soi. Cela suppose de mobiliser certains outils pour construire, puis consolider, les piliers sur lesquels pourra venir s’édifier la Nation en devenir et s’ancrer un imaginaire national, soit la cristallisation d’imaginaires individuels capables de se reprĂ©senter comme la partie d’un tout. Que ces piliers aient Ă  voir avec « l’identitĂ© nationale », « l’histoire nationale », la « culture nationale »  (Anderson, 2006 ; Bourdieu, 2010a ; Bourdieu, 2012c ; Gellner, 1989 ; Nora, 1984), tous en appellent peu ou prou aux mĂ©moires collectives des communautĂ©s Ă  « nationaliser », en tant qu’outils d’ancrage social ou de lĂ©gitimation sociopolitique. Les mĂ©canismes de la JT sont bien des lieux de mĂ©moires, et cela Ă  deux niveaux : en tant que lieux de cristallisation de l’identitĂ© collective et en tant qu’arĂšnes oĂč se construit, se rationalise, se met en rĂ©cit et s’officialise la mĂ©moire nationale. La JT devient un laboratoire symbolique et rĂ©el de concentration et de fabrication des composants de la nation officielle et lĂ©gitime. Évidemment, ce processus de crĂ©ation d’un mĂ©moriel officiel pour la nouvelle nation, loin d’apparaĂźtre de façon naturelle et dans le consensus, accouche dans la douleur, Ă  travers des luttes et des confrontations explicites ou tacites (Nora, 1993, 1010 ; Bourdieu, 2010c ; Mendeloff, 2004, 370 ; Jelin, 2007). Maurice Halbawchs expliquait jadis que toute mĂ©moire collective se construisait au sein d’un groupe social par un recoupement permanent expĂ©riences personnelles vĂ©cues et de souvenirs individuels ressentis parmi ses membres. Il prĂ©cisait que cette mĂ©moire n’était ni exacte, ni neutre dans la mesure oĂč elle combinait des perspectives plurielles, qu’elle n’était que le produit d’une relation rĂ©ciproque entre les souvenirs individuels et le rĂ©cit collectif dans lequel ceux-ci prenaient progressivement place et sens (1952, 1968). Une fois une mĂ©moire individuelle investie dans la construction de la mĂ©moire d’un autre groupe, elle reste le produit des autres rĂ©cits qui l’ont traversĂ©e, lesquels s’intĂšgrent Ă  la mĂ©moire collective en devenir (voy. aussi Jelin, 2007). Nora en infĂšre que les usages sociaux de la mĂ©moire sont aussi divers et variĂ©s que les logiques identitaires(1993, 1010). De mĂȘme, en observant la construction des mĂ©moires collectives dans tel ou tel processus de JT, l’on est trĂšs directement confrontĂ© Ă  un enchevĂȘtrement de mĂ©moires individuelles et de mĂ©moires collectives. Les groupes rivaux faisant entendre leurs voix divergentes expriment des mĂ©moires antagonistes : la JT se donne prĂ©cisĂ©ment pour mission de les rĂ©concilier en vue d’aboutir Ă  un rĂ©cit plus cohĂ©rent et rationnel (Gandsman, 2012 ; Daly, 2008 ; Jelin, 2007 ; Aronson, 2011) et de l’authentifier comme rĂ©cit officiel de l’universalitĂ© de l’État (-nation) en devenir. Mais cette rationalisation du rĂ©cit par le biais de la rĂ©conciliation des antagonismes achoppe bien souvent en perpĂ©tuation de luttes de pouvoir notamment symboliques : les relations de pouvoir et l’appel de l’hĂ©gĂ©monie sont toujours prĂ©sents. C’est une lutte pour “ma vĂ©ritĂ©â€ avec des partisans, des entrepreneurs de la mĂ©moire et des tentatives d’appropriation (et parfois de monopolisation) des significations et des interprĂ©tations [de cette vĂ©ritĂ©] (Jelin, 2005, 198. Voy. aussi Bourdieu, 2010c ; Mendeloff, 2004, 370). Un rĂ©cit tend Ă  prendre le pas sur les autres et le choix du meilleur rĂ©cit, du plus acceptable, du plus officialisable, est souvent le rĂ©sultat d’une lutte dont le vainqueur est celui qui rĂ©pond le mieux aux valeurs et aux besoins de l’organisation sociale qu’il souhaite voir Ă©merger et auxquels l’ensemble des partenaires en lutte devront s’adapter (Nora, 1984 ; Bourdieu, 2010c). C’est dans les moments de transitions que l’on voit le mieux la façon dont luttent des trames narratives totalement incompatibles entre elles (Gandsman, 2012 ; Dube, 2011 ; Daly, 2008, 26 ; Jelin, 2007) et comment certaines finissent par triompher et s’imposer sur les concurrentes. Selon Pierre Bourdieu, entrer dans [le] jeu du politique conforme, lĂ©gitime,[officiel], c’est avoir accĂšs Ă  cette ressource progressivement accumulĂ©e qu’est “l’universel”, dans la parole universelle, dans les positions universelles Ă  partir desquelles on peut parler au nom de tous, de l’universum, de la totalitĂ© d’un groupe. On peut parler au nom du bien public, de ce qui est bien pour le public et, du mĂȘme coup, se l’approprier (Bourdieu, 2012b, 16-17). Dans cette optique sociologique, on peut Ă©galement lire la JT comme un processus du politique conforme/officiel. C’est un processus qui rĂ©pond, par exemple, Ă  des normes internationales visant Ă  apporter la bonne rĂ©ponse Ă  un passĂ© trouble. Dans ces processus, bĂ©nĂ©ficier du capital accumulĂ© de l’universel internationaliste implique d’entrer dans un jeu politique conforme au discours dominant : le discours des droits de la personne et de la dĂ©mocratie libĂ©rale. Et de fait, tout se passe comme si les mĂ©canismes de la JT Ă©tant, gĂ©nĂ©ralement, imposĂ©s par le « haut », par l’universel international, rĂ©pondaient aux standards internationaux (Robin, 2012 ; Lundy, McGovern, 2008 ; Miller, 2008 ; Nagy, 2008 ; McEvoy, 2007). Or, aujourd’hui, ces standards s’inscrivent massivement dans une logique globale de dĂ©fense du modĂšle dĂ©mocratique libĂ©ral : dans la grande majoritĂ© des cas, la transition se produit en conjonction avec un projet de libĂ©ralisation Ă©conomique et/ou politique (Miller, 2008, 270). Les « ajustements structurels » prĂ©vus dans le cadre du « processus de Washington », pour ne citer que l’exemple le plus connu, habitent et traversent la JT. Il est dĂ©sormais entendu que les transitions dĂ©mocratiques se doivent de passer Ă  une Ă©conomie de marchĂ© qui permettra aux États en devenir de trouver une place lĂ©gitime au sein de l’organisation Ă©conomique internationale (Miller, 2008, 272 ; Lundy, McGovern, 2008, 276).  Nour Benghellab CNRS

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s