Eredi cosmopoliti, mercenari dell’imperialismo, missionari dell’internazionalizzazione (Ing. & Fr.)

with-reverence-kris-kuksi-art

Kris Kuksi

Sociology has little presence in the discourse on globalisation.]…] However, even if becoming diversified, essential arguments continue to be formulated in the areas of economy, law and political sciences, thus leaving little room for sociology but to witness the reality of epistemic communities engaged in advocacy and issue networks often presented as the embryo of an international civil society.]…] Internationalisation strategies are distinction strategies for a small privileged class that can use little discretion on the foundation of their privileges in order to continue applying the double standards, national and international: investment on international level in order to consolidate its power on a national level and, simultaneously, to ensure their national notoriety to making its voice heard on the international scene.” Yves Dezalay, EHESS, Directeur de recherche émérite CNRS. / Translated by myself

Cosmopolitan heirs, mercenaries of imperialism and missionaries of universal service.

Sociology has little presence in the discourse on globalisation. This relative absence can easily be explained for the literature about the subject is essentially produced by those who are its agents and is nothing but a prescriptive or promotional discourse. Descriptions and analysis aim to position authors as experts of a highly competitive global market. Since the demonstrations against the WTO in Seattle in 1999, ‘globalisation’ is expressed in the plural form on the topic of other possible or desirable globalisation(s). Everyone hastens to underline the risks of globalisation in order to suggest conclusions or solutions for a better regulation of international trade. However, even if becoming diversified, essential arguments continue to be formulated in the areas of economy, law and political sciences, thus leaving little room for sociology but to witness the reality of epistemic communities engaged in advocacy and issue networks often presented as the embryo of an international civil society and as the draft of “global governance”. Sociology being set aside is not solely due to the fact that globalisation represents a power game too important to leave to sociologists. When it comes to regulation and governance we enter into the realm of a general limited knowledge of the State, the only body with legitimate authority for processing these specific cases. Even when opposed on diagnosis and prescriptions related to globalisation, the various officials engaged in the struggle for the construction of an international space have much in common, particularly to take seriously the issues at stake in the globalisation. By acting as if it was a reality to promote, to combat or to control, they mobilise social and institutional resources that contribute to its existence both as a political issue as well as an impressive site around which experts in governance are rushing. By designating it as a possible future, the public controversy regarding globalisation can only encourage to invest in the construction of this new space of power. Hence, national and international concerns, far from constituting the opposition during debates on globalisation, are interwoven in reproductive elitist strategies.

In the area of international practices, dominant operators can mobilise acquired and approved resources in national fields of power, particularly state degrees and diplomas. In return, the mobilisation of an international wealth of skills and relations is a significant asset regarding the power strategies in the national field. It strengthens the dominating position of the leaders who can assert their membership in the international Establishment as the Basel committee, the circles of international commercial arbitration or alumni of the World Bank and of the IMF. It can also be a support to dominated parts that strive for recognition as importers of an expertise duly accredited outside the boundaries: for example, in the human rights or the protection of the environment.

Globalisation and its legal implications have provoked a vigourous, often acrimonious and sometimes violent debate about the democratization of global governance. Among the many reasons for this are that globalisation has made substantial demands on traditional international institutions and also been embodied in new legal forms, regimes and institutions, which to the average person seem (and frequently are) remote, fundamentally different from general rules of law made by public authorities, lacking in transparency and unaccountable. The creation of the WTO, with a wide mandate, based on the ‘single undertaking principle’, and characterized by binding dispute resolution, has extended international trade law forcefully into areas which previously were solely under national jurisdiction, thus blurring the traditional distinction between the ‘international’ and the ‘domestic’. Partly as a consequence, and partly as a result of other aspects of globalisation, areas such as the environment, public health, food safety and social welfare systems no longer fall within the province of a single nation-state alone and can no longer be dealt with adequately on this basis. Together with the rise of new international or transnational institutions and norms, the partial reconfiguration of the state means that norms ‘created somewhere else’ affect daily life in ways which were previously inconceivable. In addition, as a result of the blurring of the public-private distinction, and the use of the private sector to carry out what previously were public functions, it is more difficult to discern a public interest, to identify any specific institutions which should represent it, and to decide how decisions about the production and allocation of public goods should be made. Globalisation produces winners and losers, in rich countries as well as poor countries; and losers, rejecting loyalty and denied exit, may voice their views in a variety of ways, often conditioned but not necessarily constrained by their national political systems. Indeed, globalisation itself has provided some of the means for the creation of new transnational social movements, for example through the Internet, and these movements themselves, regardless of their politics, foster increased globalisation.

What does democracy mean in the context of the legal forms, regimes and institutions of today? Who should participate in decision-making, and how? How should decision-making be structured? A crucial issue is the disparities of political power which inform and shape legal relationships. Arguing that global social exchanges should be named ‘postmodern colonialism’, Silbey (1997) urges further efforts to identify connections between law and power and thus make justice more probable. The current system is unbalanced in favour of countries, organizations and individuals who can afford technical and in particular legal expertise, even though imported expertise is profoundly shaped by local power struggles. Aman (1998) argues that, confronted with a globalising state, courts and lawmakers need to recognize the continuing delegation of power to the private sector, and develop new forms of accountability to preserve a public voice. In this respect, ‘public’ international law needs serious rethinking.

Internationalisation strategies of the new national nobility thus contribute in the “unification process of the global scope of the new leaders”. In return, this internationalisation of professional training for new elites increase the gulf between them and their colleagues less privileged in cosmopolitan family relations and thus confined to strictly national careers. This gap is not specific to former colonized societies. Internationalisation strategies are distinction strategies for a small privileged class that can use little discretion on the foundation of their privileges in order to continue applying the double standards, national and international: investment on international level in order to consolidate its power on a national level and, simultaneously, to ensure their national notoriety to making its voice heard on the international scene. Yves Dezalay, EHESS, Directeur de recherche émérite CNRS

roelna-louw

Roelna Louw

.

La sociologie reste peu présente dans le discours sur la mondialisation. Cette relative absence s’explique aisément car cette littérature, produite essentiellement par tous ceux qui en sont les agents, relève du discours prescriptif, voire promotionnel. Les descriptions ou les analyses visent surtout à positionner leurs auteurs comme experts sur un marché très prisé. Depuis les manifestations de Seattle contre l’OMC en 1999, la « mondialisation » se décline au pluriel sur le thème des autres mondialisations possibles ou souhaitables. Chacun s’empresse d’en souligner les risques, afin de proposer son diagnostic ou ses solutions pour une meilleure régulation des échanges internationaux. Cependant, tout en se diversifiant, l’essentiel de l’argumentaire continue d’être formulé dans les registres de l’économie, du droit ou des sciences politiques, et ne sollicite guère la sociologie que pour témoigner de la réalité de ces « communautés épistémiques » de professionnels engagés ou de ces réseaux militants (advocacy and issue networks) souvent présentés comme l’embryon d’une société civile internationale et l’ébauche d’une « gouvernance mondiale ». Cette mise à l’écart de la sociologie ne tient pas seulement au fait que la mondialisation représente des enjeux de pouvoir trop importants pour les laisser aux sociologues. Dès lors qu’il est question de régulation et de gouvernance, on entre dans le domaine réservé des principaux savoirs d’État, seuls à détenir l’autorité légitime pour en traiter les affaires. Même s’ils s’opposent sur les diagnostics et les prescriptions en ce qui concerne la mondialisation, les différents agents qui sont engagés dans ces luttes pour la construction d’un espace international ont aussi beaucoup en commun, et en particulier le fait de prendre au sérieux les enjeux de la mondialisation. En faisant comme si elle était une réalité à promouvoir, à combattre ou à contrôler, ils mobilisent des ressources sociales et institutionnelles qui contribuent à la faire exister à la fois comme enjeu politique et comme un formidable chantier autour duquel s’empressent les experts en gouvernance. En la désignant comme un futur possible, la controverse publique sur la mondialisation ne peut qu’inciter à investir dans la construction de ce nouvel espace de pouvoir.

De ce fait, le national et l’international, loin de constituer l’opposition consacrée par les débats sur la mondialisation, sont étroitement imbriqués dans ces stratégies de reproduction élitistes. Dans l’espace des pratiques internationales, les opérateurs dominants sont ceux qui peuvent mobiliser des ressources acquises et homologuées dans des champs nationaux de pouvoir, en particulier des titres et des diplômes d’État. En contrepartie, la mobilisation d’un capital international de compétences et de relations représente un atout non négligeable dans les stratégies de pouvoir dans le champ national. Elle renforce la position des dominants qui peuvent faire valoir leur appartenance à ces internationales de l’establishment que constituent le Club de Bâle, les cercles de l’arbitrage commercial international ou les anciens de la Banque mondiale et du FMI. Elle peut aussi servir d’appui à des fractions dominées qui s’efforcent de se faire reconnaître en tant qu’importateurs d’une expertise dûment homologuée hors des frontières : par exemple dans les droits de l’homme ou la protection de l’environnement. Dans ces tactiques d’alliances transfrontalières, les cas de figure sont multiples. Les incertitudes et les risques de brouillage aussi. L’importance des barrières culturelles et linguistiques entre les espaces nationaux favorise les stratégies d’agent double chez les opérateurs les plus dotés ou les plus entreprenants : les stratégies cosmopolites se présentent comme servant l’intérêt national, tandis qu’inversement les stratégies nationales se revendiquent de valeurs universelles. Enfin, les logiques familiales les plus élitistes s’habillent de capital savant. Et tous ces phénomènes de double jeu s’amplifient en profitant de la relative ouverture des marchés nord-américains aux savoirs d’État, comme le droit et l’économie. Si les stratégies élitistes tendent à se doubler de stratégies savantes, c’est parce que, pour se faire reconnaître au sein de l’internationale de l’establishment, les relations familiales et les bonnes manières ne suffisent pas. Cette internationale des notables se présente comme une internationale du savoir. L’aisance culturelle et linguistique, souvent cultivée depuis le plus jeune âge dans ces établissements scolaires élitistes que sont les écoles bilingues – particulièrement dans les pays en développement –, sert de passeport pour l’accès ultérieur à des formations universitaires étrangères, dont le coût, supporté en grande partie par les familles, renforce l’effet de sélection sociale, tout en contribuant à l’occulter. Dans les familles de l’oligarchie, l’usage était d’envoyer les plus brillants des héritiers compléter leurs diplômes de droit obtenus localement par des doctorats dans les grandes facultés européennes. Ce séjour de longue durée servait d’initiation sociale pour une élite cosmopolite. Les champs professionnels se caractérisent de ce fait par une ligne de clivage très marquée : dans le monde du droit, comme dans celui de l’économie, il existe une barrière aussi discrète qu’infranchissable entre une petite élite qui y accède par la « grande porte » d’un titre international et se réserve les positions d’autorité, et tous ceux qui, du fait de leur diplôme local, sont cantonnés à des carrières de seconde classe.  Les stratégies d’internationalisation des nouvelles noblesses nationales contribuent ainsi à « une unification du champ mondial de la formation des dirigeants ». En contrepartie, cette internationalisation de la formation des nouvelles élites professionnelles accroît le fossé qui les sépare de leurs collègues moins dotés en capital familial cosmopolite, et donc cantonnés à des carrières strictement nationales. Ce clivage n’est pas l’apanage des sociétés coloniales ou dominées.  Les stratégies internationales sont des stratégies de distinction pour un petit groupe de privilégiés, auquel s’impose un minimum de discrétion sur ce qui fonde leurs privilèges, afin de pouvoir continuer à pratiquer le double jeu du national et de l’international : investir dans l’international pour renforcer leurs positions dans le champ du pouvoir national et, simultanément, faire valoir leur notoriété nationale pour se faire entendre sur la scène internationale. Pour réussir ce coup double, ils doivent cultiver à la fois la proximité et la distance avec leurs concitoyens pour les convaincre que non seulement ils partagent les mêmes valeurs, mais aussi qu’ils sont les mieux à même de promouvoir les intérêts nationaux dans la compétition internationale.

Yves Dezalay, EHESS, Directeur de recherche émérite CNRS, « Les courtiers de l’international. Héritiers cosmopolites, mercenaires de l’impérialisme et missionnaires de l’universel ».

Yves Dezalay and Bryant G. Garth, The Internationalization of Palace Wars, LAWYERS, ECONOMISTS, AND THE CONTEST TO TRANSFORM LATIN AMERICAN STATES.

Edited by Yves Dezalay and Bryant G. Garth, Lawyers and the rule of law in an era of globalization.

Edited by Yves Dezalay and Bryant G. Garth, Lawyers and the construction of transnational justice.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s