Ripensare l’impatto di sorveglianza: la sicurezza nazionale, diritti umani, soggetività e obbedienza.

hands-off

Rethinking the Impact of Surveillance: National Security, Human Rights, Democracy, Subjectivity, and Obedience-“… for one suspect with hundred first degree relations, the NSA surveillance official or a subcontractor can, without any specific warrant, monitor the 2 669 556 potential third degree connections. According to the tremendous amount of thus gathered data, analysts don’t read the entire content but visualize the identified relations graphic focusing mainly on most important sections where specific nods of network appear. […[ some services ask other security services to take over some of their tasks and thus ‘work around’ the imposed confines of foreign intelligence developing a ‘private life shopping’ based on the exchange of their own citizen surveillance with other services considered as foreigners.”

Rethinking the Impact of Surveillance: National Security, Human Rights, Democracy, Subjectivity, and Obedience – A national security and transnational surveillance Möbius strip: the unequal distribution of suspicion

Current revelations about the secret US-NSA program, PRISM, have confirmed the large-scale mass surveillance of the telecommunication and electronic messages of governments, companies, and citizens, including the United States’ closest allies in Europe and Latin America. The transnational ramifications of surveillance call for a reevaluation of contemporary practices of world politics. The debate cannot be limited to the United States versus the rest of the world or to surveillance versus privacy; much more is at stake. This collective article briefly describes the specificities of cyber mass surveillance, including the hybridization of practices coming from intelligence services and those of private companies providing services around the world. It then investigates the impact of these practices on national security, diplomacy, human rights, democracy, subjectivity, and obedience. Much of the information, particularly that linked to the technical extent, scope and sophistication of the current practices, surised all well informed observers. These practices remain with a dual meaning. This may be due partly to the fact that the vast number of details of the complex systems are difficult to track, albeit many appear to have immediate and serious consequences. It is also due partly to the fact that these details can lead to significant violations regarding the nature and legitimacy of some institutions involved in security and intelligence operations that thus stimulate intense politically controversial. Lastly it may also explain the transformations involved here, long term transformations of policies pursued by the States, of relations between the States, of institutions and established standards in respect of democratic principles, rule of law, of relations between States and civil society, between public policy and private economic interests, cultural standards acceptability and even subjectivity concepts. Thus it appears urgent to develop a systematic evaluation of scale, scope and nature of contemporary supervisory practices, both in terms of justifications and controversies they lead to. Various intelligence agencies work together to a certain extent in order to collect data for the coverage of the entire internet on a global level. Relations between agencies tend to be asymmetric – they can be competitors and consequently cooperation on sensitive matters diminishes – even if they think their collaboration as necessary for obtaining a reliable image on the global Internet. These agencies constantly claim that their resources are limited, that they need more data and exchanges and less control and less supervision, in order to speed up the process. It thus comes as no surprise that because of such specific claims, they are accused to implement forms of mass surveillance similar to the Stasi practices and to overturn the principle of

presumption of innocence by establishing an a priori suspicion, that one must clear up through a transparent behavior. Such dynamics include social and cultural changes that create new communication practices acceptability, knowledge improvement and fast changes in the expression of personal identity. Finally and most significantly, they involve the transition from the state law to the law of the market place as the ultimate measure of political and ethical values. More disturbingly we seem to enter an area of disorganized phenomena: set up neither horizontally as an international matrix of self-determined States in specific territories, nor vertically following a hierarchy of more or less important authorities.

A national security and transnational surveillance Möbius strip: the unequal distribution of suspicion

It is assumed that the work of surveillance starts with the suspicion of inappropriate and dangerous acts committed by groups under scrutiny and is followed by the identification of individuals connected to an initial group through three degrees of measurement; namely for one suspect with hundred first degree relations, the NSA surveillance official or a subcontractor can, without any specific warrant, monitor the 2 669 556 potential third degree connections. According to the tremendous amount of thus gathered data, analysts don’t read the entire content but visualize the identified relations graphic focusing mainly on most important sections where specific nods of network appear. It is far from an exhaustive reading of all the contents collected through these data. It is also far from a scientific procedure guaranteeing the certainty and precision of the obtained results. It is actually a process of intuition and interpretation that can vary widely from one analyst to the other. The fears about the rise of a modern Big Brother are therefore largely unfounded. The claim to truth, which according to this ability to access web content, has no foundation since it aims to switch from suspicion into more impressive forms of expertise by means of predictions on people’s actions, whereas forecasts of future trends are so complicated to envisage. What is at stake is not so much the relation between technology and social sciences but the relation between technology and a speculative belief in systems designed to ‘read’ the big data. The scope of potential suspicion is large in that there is no end to its expansion though it has restrictions in terms of global reach or surveillance of all. Indeed, this is the main argument of various intelligence agencies when stating that their operations follow objective criteria that narrow their search to non-nationals; thus communications involving a foreigner are being reviewed on a priority basis via a special channel even if the system identifies suspicious behaviors from nationals (in that case one will be obliged to obtain a warrant in the United-Kingdom and in the USA). The massive collection of data and its visualization through networks don’t allow the distinction between a foreigner and a national with certainty. Since the legality requirements present a threat to the functioning of the system, the latter would demand the law to adjust to it. In order to avoid such complications, a cross-border networking between various intelligence agencies allowed the blurring of jurisdictional limits and boundaries on national and foreign level. Moreover it appears that some services responsible for national security by collecting and exchanging information ask other security services to take over some of their tasks and thus ‘work around’ the imposed confines of foreign intelligence developing a ‘private life shopping’ based on the exchange of their own citizen surveillance with other services considered foreigners. In that sense for all those transnational operations, the distinction between national and foreign loses its relevance. 

Zygmunt Bauman, Didier Bigo, Paulo Esteves, Elspeth Guild, Vivienne Jabri, David Lyon, R. B. J. (Rob) Walker, “ ‪Repenser l’impact de la surveillance après l’affaire Snowden : sécurité nationale, droits de l’homme, démocratie, subjectivité et obéissance‪ ”.

Edward Snowden a révélé de très nombreuses informations sur les pratiques de l’agence américaine de sécurité nationale (National Security Agency, NSA) liées aux programmes de surveillance PRISM, Xkeyscore, Upstream, Quantuminsert, Bullrun ou encore Dishfire, ainsi que la participation des services d’autres États – comme le Quartier général des communications du gouvernement (Government Communications Headquarters, GCHQ) au Royaume-Uni, avec son programme Tempora. Une grande partie de ces informations, en particulier celles liées à l’ampleur, la portée et la sophistication technique de ces pratiques ont surpris les observateurs les plus avertis. Le sens de ces pratiques reste trouble. Cela peut en partie s’expliquer par le fait que les très nombreux détails sur les systèmes complexes qui ont été révélés sont difficiles à suivre, même si nombre d’entre eux semblent avoir des conséquences graves et immédiates. C’est également en partie parce que ces détails semblent impliquer des transgressions significatives des perceptions établies du caractère et de la légitimité des institutions impliquées dans des opérations de sécurité et de renseignement, et qu’ils stimulent ainsi des controverses politiques intenses. Enfin, cela peut aussi s’expliquer, et c’est sans doute ici l’interprétation la plus déstabilisante, par les transformations que ces révélations impliquent – des transformations de long terme des politiques des États, des relations entre les États et des institutions et des normes établies en matière de procédures démocratiques, d’État de droit, de relations entre État et société civile, de relations entre politiques publiques et intérêts économiques privés, d’acceptabilité des normes culturelles et même de concepts de subjectivité. Il semble urgent de mettre en place une évaluation systématique de l’échelle, de la portée et du caractère des pratiques de surveillance contemporaines, tant du point de vue des justifications que des controverses qu’elles entraînent. Les différentes agences de renseignement collaborent plus ou moins afin de récolter les données et couvrir ainsi l’ensemble du réseau Internet au niveau mondial. Les relations entre les agences tendent à être asymétriques – il leur arrive d’être concurrentes et leur collaboration sur des sujets sensibles se réduit alors – mais elles estiment cette collaboration nécessaire à l’obtention d’une image fiable de l’Internet mondial. Ces agences n’ont de cesse d’affirmer que leurs ressources sont trop limitées, qu’elles ont besoin de plus de données et d’échanges et de moins de contrôle et de supervision afin de pouvoir accélérer le processus. Sans surprise, ce type de revendications leur valent d’être accusés de vouloir mettre en œuvre des formes de surveillance de masse proches de celles pratiquées par la Stasi, et renverser le principe de la présomption d’innocence en instaurant une suspicion a priori, que l’individu doit dissiper par un comportement transparent. tout ce qui peut se passer en relation à la NSA est formé par des dynamiques autres que la relation entre innovation technologique et possibilité politique, qui est elle-même abordée par peu de chercheurs et encore moins de dirigeants politiques. Ces dynamiques incluent des changements sociaux et culturels qui transforment l’acceptabilité des nouvelles pratiques de communication et des modalités de la connaissance, ainsi que des changements rapides dans l’expression de l’identité personnelle. Mais de manière plus significative encore, elles incluent le passage de la loi de l’État à celle du marché comme ultime mesure de la valeur politique et éthique. De manière peut-être plus troublante encore, il semble que nous prenions part à des phénomènes qui ne sont organisés ni horizontalement, à la manière d’une matrice internationale d’États plus ou moins autodéterminés et territorialisés, ni verticalement, à la manière d’une hiérarchie d’autorités plus ou moins hautes. Les relations, les lignes de conflits, les réseaux, les intégrations et les désintégrations, les contractions et les accélérations spatiotemporelles, les simultanéités, les inversions de limites internes, externes et de plus en plus élusives entre inclusion et exclusion ou légitimité et illégitimité… la familiarité croissante avec ces notions et d’autres du même genre souligne la nécessité pressante de développer de nouvelles ressources conceptuelles et analytiques.

Un ruban de Moebius de la sécurité nationale et de la surveillance transnationale – la distribution inégale de la suspicion

On considère que le travail de renseignement commence par la suspicion d’actes dangereux commis par des groupes sous surveillance et se poursuit par l’identification d’individus inconnus connectés au groupe initial par trois degrés  de séparations ; c’est-à-dire que pour une personne suspecte qui a cent relations au premier degré, la personne responsable de sa surveillance à la NSA ou l’un de ses sous-contractants peut, sans mandat particulier, surveiller les 2 669 556 connections potentielles au troisième degré . Étant donné la masse des données ainsi accumulées, les analystes ne lisent pas tout le contenu mais visualisent le graphique des relations qui ont été identifiées et se concentrent sur ce qui semble être les sections les plus importantes, là où apparaissent des nœuds de connections spécifiques entre données. On est loin d’une lecture exhaustive de tous les contenus recueillis dans ces données. On est loin également d’une procédure scientifique garantissant la certitude et la précision des résultats obtenus. Il s’agit plutôt d’un processus d’intuition et d’interprétation qui peut varier considérablement d’un analyste à un autre. Les craintes au sujet d’un Big Brother sont donc largement infondées. La prétention à la vérité qui accompagne cette visualisation n’a pas de fondement puisqu’elle ne vise qu’à transformer la suspicion en formes plus impressionnantes d’expertise par le biais de prédictions sur les actions d’individus, alors même que les prévisions plus générales à propos de tendances à venir s’avèrent déjà assez compliquées. Ce qui est ici en jeu n’est pas tant un mariage entre technologies et science de la société qu’une union entre technologie et croyance spéculative en des systèmes conçus pour « lire » le big data. Le champ de suspicion potentielle est immense en ce qu’il n’a pas de fin et s’étend au travers de réseaux, mais il n’est pas immense en termes de portée globale ou de surveillance de tout un chacun. Tel est en effet l’argument principal des différents services de renseignement qui déclarent opérer selon des critères objectifs afin de limiter leurs recherches et de ne couvrir que les non-nationaux ; et qu’ainsi les communications impliquant un « étranger » sont examinées en priorité via un canal spécial ; même s’il semble que le système puisse identifier des comportements suspicieux de ressortissants du pays (et devra, dans ce cas, obtenir un mandat, au Royaume-Uni et aux États-Unis). La collecte massive de données et la visualisation au travers de réseaux ne permettent pas de faire la différence, avec certitude, entre un étranger et un ressortissant national. Puisque les exigences de légalité menacent le fonctionnement du système, ce dernier exigerait à son tour que la loi s’ajuste, pas lui. Afin d’éviter ce type de « complications », un travail en réseau transnational entre les différents services de renseignement a permis de brouiller les limites et les frontières des juridictions nationales et étrangères. Il semble d’ailleurs que certains des services chargés de la sécurité nationale par le biais de la collecte et de l’échange d’information demandent en effet à d’autres services de sécurité de prendre en charge certaines de leurs tâches, et contournent ainsi les limites imposées en matière de renseignement extérieur en s’adonnant à un « shopping de vie privée » qui consiste à échanger la surveillance de leurs propres citoyens avec un autre service pour lequel ces derniers sont donc considérés comme des étrangers. En ce sens et pour toutes ces opérations transnationales, la distinction entre national et étranger perd sa pertinence.

Zygmunt Bauman, Didier Bigo, Paulo Esteves, Elspeth Guild, Vivienne Jabri, David Lyon, R. B. J. (Rob) Walker, “ ‪Repenser l’impact de la surveillance après l’affaire Snowden : sécurité nationale, droits de l’homme, démocratie, subjectivité et obéissance‪ ”.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s