I CONFINI DEL DIRITTO NELLA REALTÀ SOCIALE (ING. & FR.)

The bounds of law 1 – ‘Law’ is not omnipotent within the social field and everything happens, according to societies and times, in the infinite variety of inclusion and exclusion relationships with other normative systems. Next, the issue of the so called ‘science of Law’ appears in the current epistemological range that must combine with other sciences: this shows that Law does not have a position overlooking all other disciplines, but has relations of cooperation, competition and hostility, according to the disciplines and the moments, creating questionable bounds. The only possible posture might be that of a certain epistemology like Michel Foucault when trying to think of the emergence of human sciences in Western history. Continue reading

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La posta in gioco dei diritti delle donne migranti nell’Unione europea. Schiavitù, prostituzione e traffico di donne. (Ing. & Fr.)

The Challenges of Framing Women Migrants’ Rights in the European Union

In all countries of the European Union domestic work performed by migrant women, often in an irregular legal status, is increasing. Many workers face poor living and exploitative working conditions. Over the last decades, migrant domestic workers and advocacy organizations have developed multi-level strategies to improve those living and working conditions. In the contribution different and sometimes contradicting strategies of how a European network of migrant domestic workers and other actors mobilize will be identified and analyzed. It will be argued that the resonance the network achieved in the European Union was ambivalent and encompassed unintended consequences : On the one hand it allowed structural access to EU policy makers but on the other hand it narrowed down the political opportunities due to a fusion of migration policies and security policies. Continue reading

Identità tribale e mondializzazione (ing. & fr.)

Tribal identity and globalization

Characteristic of a necessary stage in the development of human societies in evolutionary thought, the tribe is, in “classical” anthropology, an operating model  of “stateless societies”. In its broadest sense, it appears as an instrument for classification and  hierarchisation of societies and cultures. Like the ethnic group, the tribe presents identity features shared by the populations concerned. Decolonization and postmodernist deconstruction of these two notions have very clearly called into question ethnic classifications, but much less clearly the use of the term “tribe”. Reflecting the persistence of this identity referent – vigorously reaffirmed in recent decades – in the representations of the populations of a part of Africa and the Middle East, where the tribe is a name sharing reality – a local categorization, the Arabic qabīla for example – and nominative – used to identify individuals and groups, these names are perpetuated in a secular way. Continue reading