Il ruolo, l’impegno e le prestazioni delle agenzie di aiuto come importanti fornitori di beni pubblici globali. (Ing. & Fr.)

camp

Beyond much rhetoric and stated ambition in recent years, the implementation of global public policies has been weak so far. There is a huge gap between the official discourse and the reality. This chapter focuses on the role, commitment and performance of aid agencies as ‘small’ but important suppliers of global public goods. While acknowledging some advances in the right direction (broad international recognition and improved costing of the global risks, consensus on the high vulnerability of the low-income countries and the need to act urgently, and substantial financing commitments) the author argues, based on available evidence from evaluations and effectiveness reviews, that only limited progress has been made in the aid delivery model and that the poor have not yet gained much from these undertakings. The chapter makes the case that significant institutional, organisational and operational reforms must take place urgently in aid agencies. The international community, moreover, must address the high fragmentation and proliferation of the aid architecture, in order to set the stage for a credible response to the global challenges facing developing countries.

Beyond the rhetoric, ambitious pledges and some pilot- or crisis-responses to address global risks and challenges, there is only scant, weak and anecdotal evidence so far on the actual impact of these efforts in the fight against poverty and for sustainable development. While acknowledging significant outputs under some global partnership programmes such as the fight against pandemics, it remains difficult so far to link directly these results to a dramatic progress towards the MDGs and to change the life, condition and prospects of the ‘bottom billion’. This relates partly to the deficient quality of the results framework and monitoring and evaluation systems which have been reported in the external evaluations of several global programmes (e.g. Macro International Inc., 2009; IEG, 2011a). But this situation also reflects on the very nature of most ‘vertical’ programmes. Unprecedented amount of funding and attention to needy and well-targeted causes have achieved impressive outputs; but the longer-term results are still difficult to measure. Many open questions remain regarding the limited sustainability of these programmes, their excessive project versus programme approach, the possible distortion of national priorities, the eventual disruption of national delivery systems, the insufficient focus on capacity-building or the negative spillover on non-targeted populations. More than one decade after the release of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Report on the Global Public Goods (Kaul et al., 1999), it remains extremely difficult to assess the actual implementation progress and outcome of global public policies; only few evaluations have been released so far by aid agencies. This being said, the available evidence tends to confirm a rather modest overall benefit to the poor. The vulnerability of developing countries to international food price crisis, land degradation or water scarcity has not been reduced in the recent years; health hazards, protectionism and natural disasters remain persistent threats to national and sustainable development strategies. Why is it so?

Aid agencies have taken concrete and pragmatic steps to respond to needs of developing countries facing global risks; these well-targeted efforts have benefited millions of affected and vulnerable people worldwide. On the other hand, the stated intentions and commitments of the aid agencies towards global public goods were more ambitious. Beyond the support to specific projects and partnerships, they had the ambition to mainstream these global themes into their regular country strategies and operations. On this front, the aid agencies have clearly underperformed. In most agencies one observes a striking lack of specifics on how to translate the new corporate priorities into policy actions. Indeed, country directors and their teams rarely avail of the incentives and instruments to advance an agenda that is complex or may not immediately appeal to their counterparts. Nor do they receive the necessary internal budgets to be able to do so effectively. Little has also happened in the strengthening of the accountability systems, internal skills and knowledge sharing mechanisms that could create a stronger capability and momentum. In short, as reflected in most OECD/DAC Peers Reviews conducted in 2010 and early 2011, aid agencies appear to be still poorly equipped to bridge the gap between expectations related to global needs and the regular development cooperation. At the World Bank, recent reviews of development effectiveness have also highlighted this disappointing reality (IEG, 2008, 2009a). They indicate that the treatment of global public goods in Country Assistance Strategies has not significantly expanded over time; thematic networks have not provided the cross-country research, expertise and support needed to foster global public goods at individual country level; even the explicit mentioning of global public goods has been found to be diluted when passing from the thematic network anchors to the regional strategies. The global programmes have often failed to demonstrate how they bring added value to country programmes and the Bank’s operations. The country-based allocation and delivery model, which is an uncontested pillar of international development cooperation, presents also specific challenges for advancing the cause of global public policies. Indeed, this model – which rightly gives primacy to the partners’ national decision making on policies and programmes – provides an adequate platform to promote global public goods with significant benefits to be captured at country level (i.e. fight against communicable diseases). But it fails to provide a robust basis to address other global public goods with less immediate returns at national level (i.e. cleaner air or protecting the earth’s climate). This dimension has still to be reflected upon by the aid agencies.  Michel Mordasini

Someday I hope to return to Syria, to my home. But I have my family, and I have found my peace.

Ces dernières années, au-delà des effets de rhétorique et des déclarations d’intention, la mise en œuvre des politiques publiques globales est restée fragile. On observe un fossé béant entre les discours officiels et la réalité. Le présent article se concentre sur le rôle, l’engagement et la performance des agences d’aide en leur qualité de fournisseurs « modestes » mais importants de biens publics mondiaux. Tout en relevant certains progrès allant dans la bonne direction (large reconnaissance internationale et amélioration de l’estimation des risques mondiaux, consensus sur la grande vulnérabilité des pays à bas revenu et l’urgence d’agir, engagements financiers substantiels), l’article évoque les résultats des évaluations et des examens d’efficacité disponibles pour avancer que le modèle de prestation de l’aide n’a en fait évolué que dans une faible mesure et que les pauvres n’ont encore que peu bénéficié de ces promesses. L’article défend l’avis selon lequel de profondes réformes institutionnelles, structurelles et opérationnelles sont devenues urgentes dans les agences d’aide et affirme que la communauté internationale doit s’attaquer avec sérieux aux risques de fragmentation et de prolifération qui pèsent sur l’architecture de l’aide afin de se donner les moyens de répondre de manière crédible aux défis globaux qu’affrontent les pays en développement.

Ces dernières années, au-delà des effets de rhétorique et des déclarations d’intention, la mise en œuvre des politiques publiques globales est restée fragile. On observe un fossé béant entre les discours officiels et la réalité. Le présent article se concentre sur le rôle, l’engagement et la performance des agences d’aide en leur qualité de fournisseurs « modestes » mais importants de biens publics mondiaux. Tout en relevant certains progrès allant dans la bonne direction (large reconnaissance internationale et amélioration de l’estimation des risques mondiaux, consensus sur la grande vulnérabilité des pays à bas revenu et l’urgence d’agir, engagements financiers substantiels), l’article évoque les résultats des évaluations et des examens d’efficacité disponibles pour avancer que le modèle de prestation de l’aide n’a en fait évolué que dans une faible mesure et que les pauvres n’ont encore que peu bénéficié de ces promesses. L’article défend l’avis selon lequel de profondes réformes institutionnelles, structurelles et opérationnelles sont devenues urgentes dans les agences d’aide et affirme que la communauté internationale doit s’attaquer avec sérieux aux risques de fragmentation et de prolifération qui pèsent sur l’architecture de l’aide afin de se donner les moyens de répondre de manière crédible aux défis globaux qu’affrontent les pays en développement.

Au-delà de la rhétorique, de promesses ambitieuses et de quelques interventions pilotes ou d’urgence liées aux risques et aux défis globaux, on ne trouve encore que de rares traces anecdotiques de l’impact concret de ces efforts sur la lutte contre la pauvreté et pour le développement durable. Même en reconnaissant les résultats importants obtenus par certains programmes de partenariat mondiaux tels que la lutte contre les pandémies, il reste difficile d’associer directement ces accomplissements à une avancée spectaculaire vers les OMD et vers un changement de l’existence, des conditions de vie et des perspectives du « milliard d’en bas » (bottom billion). Cela vient en partie de la faible qualité des cadres de résultats et des systèmes de suivi et d’évaluation, qui a été relevée dans les évaluations externes de plusieurs programmes mondiaux (par ex. Macro International Inc., 2009 ; IEG, 2011a). Mais cette situation reflète également la nature même de la plupart des programmes « verticaux ». Des quantités inédites de fonds et d’attention consacrées à des causes urgentes et bien ciblées ont certes généré des résultats impressionnants, mais les effets à long terme restent difficilement mesurables. De nombreuses questions sont toujours ouvertes en ce qui concerne la durabilité limitée de ces programmes, leur approche trop souvent par projet au détriment d’une approche par programme, leur distorsion possible des priorités nationales, les éventuelles perturbations subies par les systèmes nationaux de distribution, l’accent insuffisant sur le développement des capacités ou les retombées négatives sur les populations non ciblées. Plus de dix ans après la publication du rapport du PNUD (Programme des Nations unies pour le développement) sur les biens publics mondiaux (Kaul et al., 1999), il est toujours extrêmement difficile d’estimer les véritables progrès de la mise en œuvre des politiques publiques globales et les résultats de celles-ci ; seules quelques rares évaluations ont été publiées à ce jour par les agences d’aide. Cela dit, les éléments de preuve disponibles tendent à confirmer la présence d’un bénéfice dans l’ensemble plutôt modeste pour les pauvres. Ni la vulnérabilité des pays en développement à la crise des prix des denrées alimentaires, ni la dégradation des sols, ni les pénuries d’eau n’ont reculé ces dernières années ; les risques pour la santé, le protectionnisme et les catastrophes naturelles restent des menaces persistantes pour les stratégies nationales et les programmes de développement durable. Pourquoi en est-il ainsi ?

Les agences d’aide ont pris des mesures concrètes et pragmatiques pour répondre aux besoins des pays en développement confrontés aux risques mondiaux. Ces efforts bien ciblés ont profité à des millions de personnes touchées et vulnérables, dans le monde entier. D’un autre côté, les intentions déclarées et les engagements des agences d’aide en faveur des biens publics mondiaux étaient plus ambitieux. Au-delà du soutien apporté à des projets et des partenariats spécifiques, les agences avaient pour objectif d’intégrer ces thèmes de réflexion globaux dans leurs stratégies et leurs activités normales par pays. Or, à cet égard, elles sont clairement restées en deçà de leur ambition. Chez la plupart d’entre elles, on observe un manque frappant de solutions concrètes visant à traduire leurs nouvelles priorités en actions politiques. En effet, les directeurs de pays et leurs équipes disposent rarement des incitations et des instruments qui permettraient de faire progresser un agenda complexe ou ne présentant pas un intérêt immédiat pour leurs homologues. Ils ne reçoivent pas non plus les budgets internes nécessaires pour le faire efficacement. Peu de choses ont été entreprises pour renforcer les systèmes de responsabilisation, les aptitudes internes et les mécanismes de partage des connaissances susceptibles de stimuler les capacités et le dynamisme. Bref, comme l’indiquent la plupart des examens par les pairs du CAD de l’OCDE réalisés en 2010 et au début de 2011, les agences d’aide semblent être mal préparées pour combler l’écart séparant les attentes en matière de besoins mondiaux et la coopération au développement ordinaire. A la Banque mondiale, de récentes études sur l’efficacité des activités de développement ont également souligné cette réalité décevante (IEG, 2008, 2009a). Ces travaux indiquent que la place attribuée aux biens publics mondiaux dans les stratégies d’aide aux pays n’a pas sensiblement progressé avec le temps ; les réseaux thématiques n’ont pas fourni les recherches internationales, l’expertise et l’appui nécessaires pour promouvoir les biens publics mondiaux au niveau des différents pays ; on a même constaté que la simple mention explicite des biens publics mondiaux est édulcorée lors du passage des politiques des réseaux thématiques aux stratégies régionales. Souvent, les programmes mondiaux n’ont pas su montrer qu’ils apportent une plus-value aux programmes par pays et aux activités de la Banque mondiale. Le modèle d’allocation et d’aide par pays, qui constitue incontestablement un pilier de la coopération internationale au développement, pose aussi certains problèmes spécifiques quant à l’encouragement des politiques publiques globales. Ce modèle, qui privilégie à juste titre les processus décisionnels nationaux des partenaires sur les politiques et les programmes, offre une plateforme appropriée à la promotion des biens publics mondiaux assortis d’importants bénéfices au niveau du pays (p. ex. la lutte contre les maladies transmissibles). Mais il ne constitue pas une base solide pour traiter d’autres biens publics mondiaux dont les gains sont moins immédiats à l’échelon national (p. ex. un air plus propre ou la protection du climat). Cette dimension nécessite des réflexions plus approfondies de la part des agences d’aide. Michel Mordasini

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s